hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 158 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 66 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 40 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 20 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 20 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 16 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 16 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Persians (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 8 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller). You can also browse the collection for Hellespont (Turkey) or search for Hellespont (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 2, chapter 1 (search)
the king of Greater Phrygia, is coming at the head of 8000 horse and not fewer than 40,000 lancers and peltasts; and Aribaeus, the king of Cappadocia, has 6000 horse and not fewer than 30,000 bowmen and peltasts; while the Arabian, Aragdus, has about 10,000 horsemen, about 100 chariots of war, and a great host of slingers. As for the Greeks who dwell in Asia, however, no definite information is as yet received whether they are in the coalition or not. But the contingent from Phrygia on the Hellespont, under Gabaedus, has arrived at Cay+stru-Pedium, it is said, to the number of 6000 horse and 10,000 peltasts.The Carians, however, and Cilicians and Paphlagonians, they say, have not joined the expedition, although they have been invited to do so. But the Assyrians, both those from Babylon and those from the rest of Assyria, will bring, I think, not fewer than 20,000 horse and not fewer, I am sure, than 200 war-chariots, and a vast number of infantry, I suppose; at any rate, they used to h
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 4, chapter 2 (search)
s, while the most of them sought refuge in precipitate flight. We may imagine that they were doing many other things also—all sorts of other things—except that no one offered to resist, but they perished without striking a blow. As it was summer, Croesus, the king of Lydia, had had his women sent on by night in carriages, that they might proceed more comfortably in the cool of the night, and he himself was following after with his cavalry. And the Phrygian king, the ruler of Phrygia on the Hellespont, they say, did the same. And when they saw the fugitives who were overtaking them, they enquired of them what was happening, and then they also took to flight as fast as they could go. But the king of Cappadocia and the Arabian king, as they were still near by and stood their ground though unarmed, were cut down by the Hyrcanians. But the majority of the slain were Assyrians and Arabians. For as these were in their own country, they were very leisurely about getting away. Now the Medes and
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 7, chapter 4 (search)
oops or engines; but Adusius answered that even the army he had with him was at the disposal of Cyrus to employ elsewhere. And with those words he started to lead back his army, leaving only garrisons upon the citadels. But the Carians pleaded with him to stay; and when he refused, they sent to Cyrus to petition him to send Adusius to be their satrap. Cyrus had meanwhile sent off Hystaspas inThe conquest of the lesser Phrygia command of an expedition against the Phrygia that lies along the Hellespont. So when Adusius returned, he directed him to march on in the direction Hystaspas had taken, that they might submit to Hystaspas more readily when they heard that another army was on the way. Now the Greeks who dwelt by the sea gave many gifts and secured an agreement to the effect that while they should not receive the barbarians“Barbarians,” from the Greek point of view,; that is, Persians. within their walls, they would yet pay tribute and serve under him in the field wherever Cyrus sho
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 8, chapter 6 (search)
these words he concluded his address onCyrus appoints the satraps that occasion; and then he chose out from the number of his friends those whom he saw eager to go on the conditions named and who seemed to him best qualified, and sent them as satraps to the following countries: Megabyzus to Arabia, Artabatas to Cappadocia, Artacamas to Phrygia Major, Chrysantas to Lydia and Ionia, Adusius to Caria (it was he for whom the Carians had petitioned), and Pharnuchus to Aeolia and Phrygia on the Hellespont. He sent out no Persians as satraps over Cilicia or Cyprus or Paphlagonia, because these he thought joined his expedition against Babylon voluntarily; he did, however, require even these nations to pay tribute. As Cyrus then organized the service, so is it even to this day: the garrisons upon the citadels are immediately under the king's control, and the colonels in command of the garrisons receive their appointment from the king and are enrolled upon the king's list. And he gave orders to