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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 158 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 66 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 40 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 20 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 20 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 16 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 16 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Persians (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 8 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Polybius, Histories. You can also browse the collection for Hellespont (Turkey) or search for Hellespont (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 6 document sections:

Polybius, Histories, book 4, Contrast between Byzantium and Calchedon (search)
nd the same is the case with a voyage on either side of Byzantium. For if a man is running before a south wind from the Hellespont, or to the Hellespont from the Pontus before the Etesian winds, if he keeps to the European shore, he has a direct and Hellespont from the Pontus before the Etesian winds, if he keeps to the European shore, he has a direct and easy course to the narrow part of the Hellespont between Abydos and Sestos, and thence also back again to Byzantium: but if he goes from Calchedon along the Asiatic coast, the case is exactly the reverse, from the fact that the coast is broken up by Hellespont between Abydos and Sestos, and thence also back again to Byzantium: but if he goes from Calchedon along the Asiatic coast, the case is exactly the reverse, from the fact that the coast is broken up by deep bays, and that the territory of Cyzicus projects to a considerable distance. Nor can a man coming from the Hellespont to Calchedon obviate this by keeping to the European coast as far as Byzantium, and then striking across to Calchedon; for the Hellespont to Calchedon obviate this by keeping to the European coast as far as Byzantium, and then striking across to Calchedon; for the current and other circumstances which I have mentioned make it difficult. Similarly, for one sailing out from Calchedon it is absolutely impossible to make straight for Thrace, owing to the intervening current, and to the fact that both winds are unf
Polybius, Histories, book 4, Byzantium, The Gauls, And Rhodians (search)
Byzantium, The Gauls, And Rhodians These Gauls had left their country with Brennus, and The Gauls, B. C. 279. having survived the battle at Delphi and made their way to the Hellespont, instead of crossing to Asia, were captivated by the beauty of the district round Byzantium, and settled there. Then, having conquered the Thracians and erected TyleOr Tylis, according to Stephanos Byz., who says it was near the Haemus. Perhaps the modern Kilios. into a capital, they placed the Byzantines in extreme danger. In their earlier attacks, made under the command of Comontorius their first king, the Byzantines always bought them off by presents amounting to three, or five, or sometimes even ten thousand gold pieces, on condition of their not devastating their territory: and at last were compelled to agree to pay them a yearly tribute of eighty talents, until the time of Cavarus, in whose reign their kingdom came to an end; and their whole tribe, being in their turn conquered by the Thracians, w
Polybius, Histories, book 4, The War between Rhodes and Byzantium Begins (search)
because they did not wish to leave in any one else's hands a point of vantage to be used against merchants sailing into the Pontus, or one which commanded the slave trade, or the fishing. Besides this, Prusias had seized in Asia a district of Mysia, which had been in the possession of Byzantium for many years past. Meanwhile the Rhodians manned six ships and received four from their allies; and, having elected Xenophantus to command them, they sailed with this squadron of ten ships to the Hellespont. Nine of them dropped anchor near Sestos, and stopped ships sailing into the Pontus; with the tenth the admiral sailed to Byzantium, to test the spirit of the people, and see whether they were already sufficiently alarmed to change their minds about the war. Finding them resolved not to listen he sailed away, and, taking up his other nine ships, returned to Rhodes with the whole squadron. Meanwhile the Byzantines sent a message to Achaeus asking for aid, and an escort to conduct Tiboetes
Polybius, Histories, book 5, Weakness of Ptolemy Philopator (search)
though his predecessors, far from taking less interest in foreign affairs, had generally given them precedence over those of Egypt itself. For being masters of Coele-Syria and Cyprus, they maintained a threatening attitude towards the kings of Syria, both by land and sea; and were also in a commanding position in regard to the princes of Asia, as well as the islands, through their possession of the most splendid cities, strongholds, and harbours all along the seacoast from Pamphylia to the Hellespont and the district round Lysimachia. Moreover they were favourably placed for an attack upon Thrace and Macedonia from their possession of Aenus, Maroneia, and more distant cities still. And having thus stretched forth their hands to remote regions, and long ago strengthened their position by a ring of princedoms, these kings had never been anxious about their rule in Egypt; and had naturally, therefore, given great attention to foreign politics. But when Philopator, absorbed in unworthy in
Polybius, Histories, book 5, The Gauls In Asia (search)
lus had brought over from Europe to assist him against Achaeus on account of their reputation for courage, had separated from that monarch on account of the jealous suspicions of which I have before spoken, and were plundering the cities on the Hellespont with gross licentiousness and violence, and finally went so far as actually to besiege Ilium. In these circumstances the inhabitants of the Alexandria in the Troad acted with commendable spirit. They sent Themistes with four thousand men and fod out an army; and in a pitched battle put the men to the sword on the field, and slew nearly all their women and children in the camp, leaving the baggage to be plundered by his soldiers. This achievement of Prusias delivered the cities on the Hellespont from great fear and danger, and was a signal warning for future generations against barbarians from Europe being over-ready to cross into Asia. Such was the state of affairs in Greece and Asia. Meanwhile the greater part of Italy had joined the
Polybius, Histories, book 8, The Gallic King, Cauarus (search)
The Gallic King, Cauarus Cauarus, king of the Gauls in Thrace, was of a truly Cauarus, king of the Gauls, settled on the Hellespont. See 4, 46 and 52. royal and high-minded disposition, and gave the merchants sailing into the Pontus great protection, and rendered the Byzantines important services in their wars with the Thracians and Bithynians. . . . This king, so excellent in other respects, was corrupted by a flatterer named Sostratus, who was a Chalchedonian by birth. . . .