hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,742 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1,016 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 996 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 274 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 180 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 164 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 142 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 130 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Alabama (Alabama, United States) or search for Alabama (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
ent will prevent the execution of a contract for the introduction of 24,000 Creeks into Texas. On the same day, the Committee of Vigilance for Nacogdoches also wrote to President Jackson, giving the details of the aforesaid contract, pointing to its violation of the treaty of 1831, and soliciting the interference of the United States Government; praying that a sparse and defenseless population be protected from the evils that were so tragically manifested on the frontiers of Georgia and Alabama. Niles's Register, vol. XLIX., p. 16Q. This letter was signed by Sam Houston and five others. Mr. Castello, Mexican charge d'affaires, offered the same remonstrance, October 14, 1835. President Jackson took the steps necessary to prevent the threatened irruption. In the beginning of the Texan Revolution, the Consultation, a provisional government, representing the municipalities, met November 3, 1835. On November 13th, on the motion of Sam Houston, it made a solemn declaration to
the antislavery agitation. It was so considered in the South then. It was there held to be a gross violation of the Constitution. The success of this party opened to the South a vista of unnumbered ills. The Gulf States resolved on immediate separation: South Carolina began by seceding December 20, 1860; the others quickly followed; and the government of the Confederate States was formed. The Confederate Government was organized February 8, 1861, by South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, which adopted a Constitution not differing materially from the old one. It was not of the provisions of the Constitution that they complained, but of their infraction. The Convention of Texas passed an ordinance of secession February 1st, which was ratified by a vote of the people February 23d, and went into effect March 2d. Thus, the seven most southern States presented a compact front to the Union, from the Rio Grande to the Atlantic. The party in those S
ecurity against disaster. I feel assured that I can command the requisite number of men, but we are deficient in arms. By letter of the 15th instant, borne by a special messenger, I have called earnestly upon the Governors of Georgia and Alabama for arms which I am assured they possess. If I fail with them, I shall appeal to your Excellency for your support and assistance. I believe that those States have quite a number of arms, and that a portion, at least, of them ought to be sparednfluence was, and what an element of weakness it became to the Confederacy on General Johnston's line. the Alleghany Mountains and their Western side-ranges form a huge quadrangle, extending from Pennsylvania southwestwardly into Georgia and Alabama, and embracing Western Virginia, East Tennessee, and Eastern Kentucky. Its population, the overflow by emigration of the poorer classes of Virginia and North Carolina, was rude, hardy, and ignorant. A sort of clanship, based on association and
ent, p. 808. The following letter was addressed to the Governor of Alabama, a duplicate being sent to the Governor of Georgia, and a similar I am, etc., (Signed) A. S. Johnston. A. B. Moore, Governor of Alabama. Executive Department, Montgomery, Alabama, September 23, 1851. contemplated by your letter, regret that it is out of the power of Alabama to afford you any assistance in the way of arms. Our own coast ise calls on Arkansas and Tennessee, but not to draw on Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, or Georgia, without the consent of this department. Tdetached companies, without any special sanction, from (I believe) Alabama. Terry's regiment has joined; the other, De Yeuve's, from Louisiaending an invasion. The same call was made on the Governors of Alabama and Mississippi. General Johnston requested also that the troops of North Alabama, and slave-laborers recruited in the same region, should be sent forward to Fort Henry, on the Tennessee River; thus indi
several weeks. In the mean time his duties devolved on General Pillow. Polk offered his resignation, which was declined. He wrote to General Johnston, November 28th, I have waived my resignation, as Davis seems very much opposed to it, and shall endeavor to do my duty. A reference to Chapter XXII. will show that General Johnston was earnestly striving to raise troops during November and December, and it was about this time, November 19th, that he called on Tennessee, Mississippi, and Alabama, to furnish him militia, using the most urgent appeals. On the 27th of November he wrote the Secretary of War, reporting a continued increase of the enemy's force, which had augmented in his front to thirty-seven regiments. The rest of the letter is as follows: I suppose a change of the plan of operations has been made, and that the force intended for East Tennessee will now be combined with the force on this line, making an aggregate strength of probably more than 50,000 men to
our disposal would allow. A negro force, which was offered by planters on the Tennessee in North Alabama, was employed on the work, and efforts were made to push it to completion as fast as the meahe soldiers, at the cost of health, drill, and discipline. The authorities of Tennessee and Alabama did what they could to obtain the labor demanded. Official action was supplemented by patriotic voluntary effort. A committee of leading citizens of North Alabama and Tishomingo County, Mississippi, headed by General Samuel D. Weakley, appealed to the people in a private circular letter, Nov Tilghman on the 3d or 4th of January, advising him that laborers were then in transitu from North Alabama. The general came to Fort Henry on the 15th-and then it was, when I left, debated whether inion that a failure to occupy the heights would be equivalent to abandoning Fort Henry. The Alabama troops are raw and undisciplined. In my poor opinion, a disciplined regiment should be sent to
Munford's account. John C. Brown. preparations for retreat. protests of the Kentuckians. Colonel Woolley's account of General Johnston's work at Bowling Green. evacuation of Bowling Green. the March. Kentucky brigade. precautions. Donelson surrendered. at Nashville. Munford's account. panic and mob. Floyd. retreat. Forrest. Governor Harris. letter to the Secretary of War. Forts Henry and Donelson had fallen, and the great water highways were opened to Nashville and to North Alabama. This gave access to the rear of the Confederate armies, and turned the positions both at Bowling Green and Columbus. Of course, such misfortunes could not happen in his department without subjecting General Johnston to the severest criticism, and we shall presently see to what heights of excitement and depths of bitterness the tide of feeling ran. That mighty surge of wrath belonged to the hour, but it has left its mark on the military history of the times, and in the criticism which
ront and on right flank by Buell's large army, will be in a very critical condition, and may be forced to take refuge on the south side of the Tennessee River, in Alabama and Georgia, or Eastern Tennessee. But should Halleck adopt the second plan referred to, the position at Columbus will then become no longer tenable for an army nder my command will amount to about 17,000 men. General Floyd, with a force of some 2,500 men, has been ordered to Chattanooga to defend the approaches toward North Alabama and Georgia, and the communications between the Mississippi and the Atlantic, and with the view to increase his forces by such troops as may be sent forward frnearly impossible. General Hodge, in his sketch, says of the road taken: Lying, for the most part, through cultivated and deep bottoms, on the edge of Northern Alabama it rises abruptly to cross the great plateau thrown out from the Cumberland Mountains, here nearly a thousand feet above the surrounding country and full fo
uell's letter to Grant, New York World, April 6, 1866. General Buell gives the following summary of his share in the campaign before Shiloh, in a letter published in the United States Service Magazine, to the statements of which his high character must secure entire credit: I deemed it best that mine [my army] should march through by land, because such a movement would clear Middle Tennessee of the enemy and facilitate the occupation of the Memphis & Charleston Railroad through North Alabama, to which I had assigned General Mitchell. I believed, also, that I could effect the movement almost as promptly that way as by water, and I knew that it would bring my army upon the field of future operations in better condition. I commenced my march from Nashville on the 15th of March, with a rapid movement of cavalry, followed by McCook's division, to seize the bridges which were yet in possession of the enemy. The latter, however, succeeded in destroying the bridge over Duck River
he field of combat, will move by the Grier's Ford road. A regiment of the infantry reserve will be thrown forward to the intersection of the Gravel Hill road with the Ridge road to Hamburg, as a support to the cavalry. The Reserve will be formed of Breckinridge's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, as now organized, the whole under the command of Brigadier-General Breckinridge. V.-General Bragg will detach the Fifty-first and Fifty-second Regiments, Tennessee Volunteers, Blount's Alabama, and Desha's Arkansas Battalions, and Bain's battery, from his corps, which, with two of Carroll's regiments, now en route for these headquarters, will form a garrison for the post and depot of Corinth. VI.-Strong guards will be left at the railroad-bridges between Iuka and Corinth, to be furnished in due proportions from the commands at Iuka, Burnsville, and Corinth. VII.-Proper guards will be left at the camps of the several regiments of the forces in the field; corps commanders w
1 2