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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,742 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1,016 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 996 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 274 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 180 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 164 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 142 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war. You can also browse the collection for Alabama (Alabama, United States) or search for Alabama (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 1: (search)
r Jonathan, leading with fervent ardor. While the war was in progress, it so happened that I was far removed from the seaboard and border States, in southern Alabama, where our people, encompassed and blockaded by the Federal forces, were most sadly straitened and distressed. It is of the exigencies of that stormy day, as hydacre, as the first spots for the negro uprising for the extermination of the Southern whites. When my brothers had left for Virginia, I started again for southern Alabama, to renew my school duties. As the train sped onward through the tall, long-leaved pines and funereal cypress-trees rising here and there on either side, a We had surmised that our sequestered vale must have been the spot where the Indian chief and his braves thrust their tomahawks deep down in the soil, with their Alabama, here we rest! But soon it came home to us, as the earnestness of the strife began to be realized, and when we found ourselves encompassed by the Federal blockad
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 2: (search)
cotton. All agriculturists, large or small, were also required by our government to give for the support of our soldiers one tenth of all the provisions they could raise, --a requirement with which we were only too willing to comply. In southern Alabama before the war the cultivation of cereals was quite rare. There Cotton was indeed king. I think this saying was true in all the Southern States. It applied to all the territory south of Virginia, Tennessee, and Missouri, at any rate. y the wind was clean and white. The only objection to it was that it was more splintered than if it had gone through a better mill. Mills had also to be erected for grinding sugar-cane and the sorghum-cane, as some sorghum was raised in southern Alabama. In our settlement only the green and ribbon cane were grown, which, like the cereals, were never cultivated before the war. What cane had been grown was in patches owned by slaves, and for the saccharine juice alone. Wooden cylinders had
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 3: (search)
He brought her a bottle, and when shown me I could scarce believe it home-made, as there was no apparent difference between this bottle of oil so produced in southern Alabama and that which we had been wont to buy before the blockade. Shoes and leather soon became very high-priced, bringing home to us the fact that we had indeextremely difficult when the war had cut off our supply. This was true especially in regions remote from the sea-coast and border States, such as the interior of Alabama and Georgia. Here again we were obliged to have recourse to whatever expedient ingenuity suggested. All the brine left in troughs and barrels, where pork had beon any shade desirable could be obtained. My garnet-colored dress of unbleached sheeting was often mistaken for worsted delaine. Many of the planters in southern Alabama began to grow wool on quite a large scale, as the war went on and no woolen goods could be had. All the woolen material that could be manufactured at the cot
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 4: (search)
th was dyed. how shoes, thread, hats, and bonnets were manufactured There was some pleasant rivalry as to who should be the most successful in producing the brightest and clearest tinge of color on thread or cloth. Most of the women of southern Alabama had small plats of ground for cultivating the indigo bush, for making indigo blue, or indigo mud, as it was sometimes called. The indigo weed also grew abundantly in the wild state in our vicinage. Those who did not care to bother with indor only enough to trim a hat. For the plumes of our hats or bonnets the feathers of the old drake answered admirably, and were often plucked, as many will remember, for that very purpose. Quaker or Shaker bonnets were also woven by the women of Alabama out of the bulrushes that grew very tall in marshy places. These rushes were placed in the opening of the threads of warp by hand, and were woven the same as if the shuttle had passed them through. Those the width of the warp were always used
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 6: (search)
Chapter 6: Aunt Phillis and her Domestic Trials. knitting around the fireside. tramp, tramp of the spinners One blustering, drizzling March night at our home in Alabama the two little daughters of Uncle Ben and Aunt Phillis, who, since their early childhood had been brought up in Mr. G--‘s house as servants, came rushing into our room with the startling intelligence that Daddy's arter mammy; he's got an axe in his hand and says he's gwine ter kill her dis berry night. Where Phillis was hiding the little girls knew not. She was not in the kitchen, nor in her cabin; neither had she come into the house to her master and mistress. Her's dodgina 'round to keep out'en daddy's way, the younger of Phillis's girls declared. We all became deeply interested in Aunt Phillis's troubles, and dropped our knitting and crocheting in severe disapprobation of the way in which Ben was treating his helpmate, and our censure was the more emphasized when we remembered the smutting he ha
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 7: (search)
Chapter 7: Weaving heavy cloth. Expensive prints. blood will tell As no muslin could be bought for summer wear, and our home-made cloth was very heavy and warm for hot weather, we women of southern Alabama devised a plan for making muslin out of our own homespun thread; and the fact that it was made of this thread added not a little to its excellence in our estimation. In the weaving of all heavy, thick cloth, whether plain or twilled, two threads, sometimes three, were a, but a large quantity was made. That which was dyed a very dark brown, and with which great pains had been taken in raising the lint, was, at some little distance, sometimes mistaken for sealskin. So much for the ingenuity of the women of southern Alabama. Soon after we had finished our selfim-posed task of carding and spinning the warp and woof for our four dresses, and it had been noised far and wide in our neighborhood that we had had patience to hold out until the task was completed,
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 9: (search)
d. their barbecues It may excite some amusement to record the fact that among the thousand and one industries and makeshifts which blossomed into life in southern Alabama during the period of the war, the making of hoopskirts, which were worn extensively before, as well as during, and even for some time after, hostilities betwineness of texture, were almost the equal, and in lasting power were more than the equal, of those bought at stores. One of my pupils, who is yet living in southern Alabama, prepared enough of such thread with her own hands to give me as a present, with the expressed desire that I should knit for myself a pair of stockings. I ues, called to preside at the heads of the tables, would bid them all to seat themselves,--by fifties, it often was,--when, with hands uplifted, they invoked the divine blessing. Many in southern Alabama yet retain a vivid recollection of these regular annual barbecues, given to the slaves when the crops had all been laid by.
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 10: (search)
Chapter 10: Painful Realities of civil strife. straitened condition of the South. Treatment of prisoners Often have we sat on the colonnade of that lovely Alabama home, and wondered if any part of the world could be more beautiful We would number the stars at night as they peeped forth one by one, in the clear blue vault above, until they became innumerable, and then the full moon would deluge the whole scene with its shining flood of light. Or perhaps it would be in the deep be at my father's house. Here and in all the surrounding neighborhood, as far as I could see, the same vigorous efforts were put forth to feed and clothe the soldiers of our Confederacy, as well as the home ones, that I had witnessed in southern Alabama. There was the same self-sacrifice, without a thought of murmuring for the luxuries enjoyed before the war. Yet with the nicest economy, and the most studied husbandry, --however generously the earth might yield of grain, fruits, and vegeta
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 11: (search)
roach of the Northern army. Leaving a broken home circle, I returned to southern Alabama, where everything was moving on as before; the thump of the house-loom andn, remember it is just as near heaven in Virginia as it is here in our home in Alabama. Years after the young man had been buried, I happened one Sunday to be atten enforced his text by relating an incident. He told how a young man native of Alabama, wounded in battle, lay dying in a hospital hear Richmond. The minister, in vme kind friend will bear a message to my mother, who is a widow living down in Alabama. I am her only son and child. Please say to her from me these words: Remember that it is just as near heaven in Virginia as it is in our home in Alabama. There has never been a night on the tented field, or when entering into battle, when how fervent and plaintive was the prayer that ascended that April night in southern Alabama, from hundreds of dwellings peopled only by women, children, and negro sla
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 12: (search)
that could be easily carried with them. It really seemed as if the wreck was a greater blow than the loss of the stock would have been, and for a few days there was sore grief in that household. But they soon roused themselves, on reflection that they yet had their stock left to plow the already planted crop, and a roof over their heads, while many were left without stock to tend their crop, or house to rest in. A disabled soldier of our Confederacy, who lived in the southern part of Alabama, near the Choctawhatchee River, with his wife and five small children was visiting relatives in our neighborhood. They had driven through in their own carriage, to which two fine horses were hitched. They had packed in their carriage what was most useful and valuable to them as wearing apparel, all their valuables in jewelry and plate, bed — quilts, counterpanes, a feather-bed and pillows, bandboxes, hatboxes, trunks, and many other articles of value. I saw the carriage unpacked, and st
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