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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,742 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1,016 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 996 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 274 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 180 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 164 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 142 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Alabama (Alabama, United States) or search for Alabama (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fifth annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society, October 31st., 1877. (search)
most carefully preserved as material for the future historian. Address of General John T. Morgan, U. S. Senator from Alabama. The efforts of the Southern Historical Society have been most appropriately directed to the collection of facts relaut touchinly-appropriate tribute to the memory of Admiral Raphael Semmes, late Vice-President of the Society for the State of Alabama, and, on motion of General Dabney H. Maury, the following minute was unanimously adopted: The death of Admiral Raphael Semmes, the Vice-President of this Society for the State ot Alabama, having occurred since the last annual meeting, the Sciety takes this occasion to express its high admiration for the exalted character, eminent abilities, and distinguished sanimously adopted. The President then announced the selection of General E. W. Pettus, of Selma, as Vice-Pesident for Alabama; and Col. Thos. H. Carter, of King William county, Va., formerly Chief of Artillery of Rodes' Division, A. N. V., as a m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The true story of the capture of Jefferson Davis. (search)
t to the troops, hoping by this means to prevent a disintegration of the command. The specie was sent, but the troops did not come forward. Under these circumstances the President determined to abandon the design of taking the troops with him, and to endeavor to make his own way, with only a small party, by a detour to the southward of the parts of the country occupied by the enemy, across the Chattahoochee. It was believed that Generals Taylor and Forrest were yet holding the field in Alabama and Mississippi, and that many soldiers who had not been surrendered and paroled in Virginia or North Carolina, would join those commands and might constitute a formidable force. In the event, however, of finding the position in those States untenable, it was then his purpose to cross the Mississippi river, in the hope of continuing the struggle with the forces yet free to operate in the Transmississippi Department, until the Government of the United States should agree to such terms of pe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appeal of the Lee Monument Association. (search)
ors and Representatives in the Congress of the United States, being assured that you will not be slow to manifest, by an earnest and liberal support, your veneration for the life, character and services of our great chief, express hereby our warm sympathy and co-operation in the effort of the Lee Monument Association to consummate this work of love: John T. Morgan, Wm. H. Forney, C. M. Shelley, H. H. Herbert, Wm. W. Garth, J. N. Williams, R. F. Ligon, Jas. Taylor Jones, G. W. Hewitt, of Alabama; A. H. Garland, L. C. Gause, Jordan E. Cravens, T. M. Gunter, W. F. Slemons, of Arkansas; Charles W. Jones, R. H. M. Davidson, of Florida; J. B. Gordon, Benj. H. Hill, Alexander H. Stephens, Julian Hartridge, W. H. Felton, James H. Blount, Philip Cook, H. P. Bell, H. R. Harris, M. A. Candler, W. E. Smith, of Georgia; J. Proctor Knott, Albert S. Willis, J. E. S. Blackburn, Thomas Turner, J. G. Carlisle, John W. Caldwell, A. R. Boone, J. A. McKenzie, M. J. Durham, J. B. Clarke, of Kentucky; J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
are still a large number of old subscribers to whom we are not now sending our Papers simply because their time is out and they have failed to renew their subscriptions. We are very sorry to part with any of our friends, but we are obliged to insist upon our terms-$3 per annum in advance. We beg that subscribers in every locality will stir up the pure minds of their neighbors by way of remembrance, and will send us new subscribers or the renewals of old ones. General Geo. D. Johnston of Alabama has been duly appointed gene-ral agent of our Society and authorized to travel in our interest, to collect money or material for us, to appoint local agents, or to act for us as occasion may demand. We deemed ourselves fortunate in securing the services of this gallant soldier and accomplished gentleman, and the result has fully justified our expectations. He has been canvassing Nashville with the most gratifying success, and now proposes to visit other cities and towns of Tennessee and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Murfreesboro. (search)
g (who had twice ridden carefully over the ground with me) and the General commanding, who had personally inspected the lines, it was the strongest position the nature of the ground would allow. About six hundred yards in front of Hanson's center was an eminence which it was deemed important to hold. It commanded the ground sloping towards the river in its front and on its left, and also the plain on the west bank occupied by the right of Withers' line. Colonel Hunt with the Fortyfirst Alabama, the Sixth and Ninth Kentucky, and Cobb's battery, all of Hanson's brigade, was ordered to take and hold this hill, which he did, repulsing several brisk attacks of the enemy, and losing some excellent officers and men. A few hundred yards to the left and rear of this position a small earthwork, thrown up under the direction of Major Graves, my Chief of Artillery, was held during a part of the operations by Semple's battery of Napoleon guns. In the afternoon of Tuesday, the 30th, I recei