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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,742 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1,016 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 996 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 274 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 180 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 164 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 142 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for Alabama (Alabama, United States) or search for Alabama (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 7 document sections:

Chapter 22: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862 Including events to June 18, of the Cumberland Gap Campaign, East Tennessee
ong but prosperous march, on the 8th day of this month. We succeeded in bringing away from Fort Donelson nearly the whole of the men belonging to my own brigade who were there; and although the fatigue and privations of a large number of them were unusually great, the men uttered no complaint, and are now, at the end of a march of 250 miles, in good health and excellent spirits. This point is one of very considerable military importance, as it commands important passes into Georgia and Alabama, and would enable the enemy, if he held it, to cut off completely the communications between the eastern and western parts of this State. General Johnston authorized me to receive such troops as might be offered for the defense of this place and who would enlist for the war. It will require, I should think, a force of about 6,000 men to secure this point from attack, except by a very heavy force, and I do not see how this number of men can be raised by any influence I can bring to bear.
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), March 9-14, 1862.-expedition toward Pardy and operations about Crump's Landing, Tenn. (search)
tigue of men and horses incident to the duties of yesterday I did not get started until 12 o'clock m. On arriving at the creek I found that the enemy had deserted his camp in that neighborhood, bat in consequence of the swollen condition of the creek and the nature of the banks I deemed it inexpedient to cross. I learned from a citizen of the neighborhood that the enemy had fallen back on Purdy and Bethel; that he supposed them to be from 5,000 to 8,000 strong, consisting of Louisiana and Alabama infantry, with some few companies of Tennessee cavalry, and the citizen from whom I obtained my information was positive that this force is well armed, principally with Sharp's and Enfield rifles. I am, sir, your obedient servant, Chas. S. Hayes, Major, Comdg. Third Battalion Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. Capt. Fred. Knefler, Assistant Adjutant-General. No. 4.-reports of Maj. Gen. Brawton Bragg, C. S. Army. Bethel Station, March 14, 1862-11.30 p. m. Colonel: After much
District of Tennessee, Knoxville, March 15, 1862. General: I have the honor to report that the enemy, having passed the Cumberland Mountains, yesterday surprised and captured, without the fire of a gun, I believe, the larger number of two companies of the First East Tennessee Cavalry near Jacksborough. Their force consisted of a regiment of infantry. Couriers who arrived last night bring the intelligence that they are moving in this direction. I have ordered forward to Clinton two Alabama regiments, the Third Regiment Tennessee Volunteers, a battalion of North Carolina Volunteers a section (two pieces) Third Maryland Artillery, and a portion First East Tennessee Cavalry (an aggregate of 2,000 men), the whole under the command of Col. D. Leadbetter, who has received such instructions from me as I thought necessary for the exigency. From what I have learned of the character of the troops from East Tennessee in our service, of their strong Union proclivities, greatly increa
J. Wright, One hundred and fifty-fourth Tennessee Infantry. No. 160.--Col. William H. Stephens, Sixth Tennessee Infantry, commanding Second Brigade. No. 161.-Col. George Maney, First Tennessee Infantry, commanding Second Brigade- No. 162.-Lieut. Col. W. D. Lannom, Seventh Kentucky Infantry. No. 163.-Col. A. J. Lindsay, First Mississippi Cavalry. No. 164.-Lieut. Col. John H. Miller, First Mississippi Cavalry. No. 165.-Lieut. Col. R. H. Brewer, battalion of Mississippi and Alabama cavalry. No. 166.-General Braxton Bragg, C. S. Army, commanding Second Army Corps. No. 167.-Brig. Gen. Daniel Ruggles, C. S. Army, commanding First Division. No. 168.-Col. Randall L. Gibson, Thirteenth Louisiana Infantry, commanding First Brigade, with application for Court of Inquiry. No. 169.-Col. James F. Fagan, First Arkansas Infantry. No. 170.-Col. H. W. Allen, Fourth Louisiana Infantry. No. 171.-Capt. E. M. Dubroca, Thirteenth Louisiana Infantry. No. 172.-Col. B.
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
service in other parts of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Alabama, but they should be made the subject of a separate g come up with him. We left camp en route to North Alabama on Monday, June 9, and encamped at this place onott commanding, made a forced reconnaissance on the Alabama road. No casualties. May 12.-One battalion Secners. On reaching the junction of this road and the Alabama road found Companies H and F, who had been left theal. He expects, through his agents in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, to obtain a sufficient present supplyennessee               Not engaged.   Ketchum's (Alabama) Battery               No casualties.   Hoxton's-enforced by three regiments (two Louisiana and one Alabama), the firing became general and of an alarming and a Cavalry   2 4 4   10 Captain Farish's company (Alabama) of cavalry       1   1 Total 8 4 12 12 7 43 ical stores, 300 kegs and barrels of powder, marked Alabama powder Company. At Colonel Elliot
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), May 1-2, 1862.-operations in the vicinity of Athens, Mooresville, Limestone Bridge, and Elk River, Ala. (search)
that side of the river that New Orleans has been captured. Since writing the above I have intelligence, through officers now prisoners in our hands, taken at Bridgeport, which I deem it my duty to communicate. They say that New Orleans is abandoned, and that the entire force of the enemy from that region will be sent forward to Corinth, and that a heavy force will be thrown across the river without a train, to be subsisted in the country, with the view to compel our abandonment of Northern Alabama. I do not know how much importance you may attach to this statement. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, O. M. Mitchell, Major-General, Commanding Third Division. Maj. Gen. D. C. Buell, Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. No. 2.-reports of Col. J. S. Scott, First Louisiana Cavalry. Athens, Ala., May 1, 1862. General: I attacked the enemy this morning at this place and drove them within 6 miles of Huntsville. They left their tents standing, a considerable quantity of th