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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,742 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1,016 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 996 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 274 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 180 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 164 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 142 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Alabama (Alabama, United States) or search for Alabama (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 11 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A defence of General Bragg's conduct at Chickamauga. (search)
attack could have been made by General Hindman by 11 o'clock, and probably sooner. He halted within cannon shot of the Cross-Roads. The delay was inexplicable to me. I remained near Hindman, at his request. I heard of no countermanding orders while with him. The enemy, at about 12:30, moved from his camp and escaped. Some infantry was double-quicked in the direction of the enemy then in motion. It was too late. I received a verbal order to charge the enemy's rear, and did so with some Alabama cavalry, about 150 strong, all that I had in that part of the field. I was repulsed after sharp loss inflicted by infantry and artillery. Withdrawing to Davis's Cross-Roads, I met you there indignant and excited at what you called the utter disregard of your orders. In reply to your inquiries, I stated what had transpired under my own observation. You expressed in the most emphatic manner your disappointment at the unexpected failure of an attack so easily to have been made and so n
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
ion we have had, serving to put upon record for the remembrance of the seniors the trials and triumphs of years long gone, and for the juniors that they be informed, so that they may share the pride we all should feel in the past history of this truly historic organization. So, I pray you, bear with me, and you shall shortly hear from more eloquent lips of the stirring scenes through which the several companies of the battalion have passed in Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Alabama. You will be made more proud when the distinguished officers, who have been chosen for the task, will fire you with their descriptions of the grand career of the five companies, which has, from defeats and victories warranted the inscription of sixty battles upon their colors. But I am digressing; let me proceed with my narration. 1861—the first act of war. For several days prior to January 9, 1861, this city was anxiously excited over the rumors that were current, pointing to som
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
pitol, and other points of interest)—an elegant dinner and delightful social intercourse with a number of gentlemen, made the day pass away very pleasantly. That night (the 22d of February) a fine audience assembled at McDonald's new and beautiful opera house (courteously tendered by the proprietor without charge), and General Lee was heard with deeply interested enthusiasm, by as highly intelligent and appreciative an auditory as often greets a speaker. It was especially fitting that Alabama's soldier-Governor, the gallant General O'Neal, should preside on the occasion, and introduced General Lee, for he had commanded the advance brigade of Rodes's division, which so gloriously opened the battle by crushing Howard's corps. General Lee put into his address a graceful tribute to General O'Neal, which was received with loud applause. At the conclusion of the lecture, General Lee received from some Virginia ladies a beautiful basket of flowers, the basket being made from willow
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
y were engaged at Cassville, Dallas, New Hope Church, Pine Mountain aad Kennesaw mountain. At the latter place fell Louisiana's lamented Bishop, General Leonidas Polk. And then in the east began the siege of Petersburg With scream of shot and burst of shell And bellowing of the mortars. In the west battles followed in quick succession. Peach Tree creek, siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, Mill Creek gap, Columbia, Franklin, second Murfreesboro, Nashville, and Spanish Fort in Mobile bay, Alabama. Meanwhile, at Petersburg, in our trenches, We lay along the battery's side, Below the smoking cannon, But— The enemy's mines had crept surely in, And the end was coming fast. It was smoke and roar and powder stench, And weary waiting for death. So the men plied their hopeless war And knew that the end was near. April 2, the lines were broken. By a singular coincidence the Fifth Company held Spanish Fort, Mobile bay, and a detachment of the Washington Artillery were in Fort G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
the enemy then in motion. It was too late. I received a verbal order to charge the enemy's rear, and did so with some Alabama cavalry, about 150 strong, all that I had in that part of the field. I was repulsed after sharp loss inflicted by infanenes through which the several companies of the battalion have passed in Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Alabama. You will be made more proud when the distinguished officers, who have been chosen for the task, will fire you with theiasm, by as highly intelligent and appreciative an auditory as often greets a speaker. It was especially fitting that Alabama's soldier-Governor, the gallant General O'Neal, should preside on the occasion, and introduced General Lee, for he had c Atlanta, Jonesboro, Mill Creek gap, Columbia, Franklin, second Murfreesboro, Nashville, and Spanish Fort in Mobile bay, Alabama. Meanwhile, at Petersburg, in our trenches, We lay along the battery's side, Below the smoking cannon, But— The
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 50 (search)
ary or early in March, when the disasters of Fort Donaldson on the Cumberland, and Henry on the Tennessee rivers, together with the evacuation by our forces, and the occupation by the enemy of Southern Kentucky, Middle and West Tennessee, and North Alabama, resulted in a concentration of all our available force under Albert Sidney Johnston, along the line of the Memphis and Charleston railroad, with Corinth as its center and base. Having organized his splendid troops, General Johnston, with ent at Richmond, and General Bragg placed in full command of the Army of the Mississippi, and soon thereafter inaugurated his celebrated Kentucky campaign. Leaving General Price behind, he moved with the remainder of his army from Tupelo, Mississippi, by rail through the States of Alabama and Georgia, and massed it in and around Chattanooga and Knoxville, in advance of Buell, who, about the 10th day of June, left Corinth with the main body of his army, via Huntsville, Alabama, for Chattanooga.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
in defence, will draw my sword on none. War. A few weeks later Colonel Lee was ordered, and came to Washington, reaching there three days before the inauguration of President Lincoln. At that time South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia and Louisiana, had already seceded from the Union, and the Provisional Government of the Confederate States was in operation at Montgomery. The Virginia Convention was in session, but slow and deliberate in its course. The State whitic wastes, dying alone inch by inch of cold and starvation, yet intent on his work, and writing lines for the benefit of others, deserved, as well as the Marshal of France, who received it, the name of bravest of the brave. The artless little Alabama girl, who was guiding General Forrest along a dangerous path when the enemy fired a volley upon him, and who instinctly spread her skirts and cried: Get behind me! had a spirit as high as that which filled the bosom of Joan of Arc, or Charlotte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
ich has so happily resulted in suitably decorating the grave of Lee. The Lee Memorial Association was formally organized October 24th, 1870, with the following officers: President—General John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky. Vice-Presidents—General J. E. Johnston, General J. A. Early, and Colonel W. H. Taylor, of Virginia; General G. T. Beauregard, Louisiana; General D. H. Hill, North Carolina; General Wade Hampton, South Carolina; General J. B. Gordon, Georgia; General W. J. Hardee, Alabama; General S. D. Lee, Mississippi; General R. S. Ewell, Tennessee; General J. B. Hood, Texas; General I. R. Trimble, Maryland; General J. S. Marmaduke, Missouri; General William Preston, Kentucky; General Tappan, Arkansas. Treasurer—C. M. Figgatt, Bank of Lexington. Secretary—Colonel C. A. Davidson, of Lexington, Virginia. The Association was incorporated by act of Assembly, January 14, 1871, and organized under its charter February 7, 1871. The Executive Committee (to the Lexingto
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
cannot say that short transportation was the cause of insufficient supplies, for at this time the army was in winter quarters at Dalton, Ga., and the cars were not used for the transportation of troops, but were used exclusively for supplies, except a few furloughed and sick men. Notwithstanding the complaints of the artillery officers, the forage question remained about the same until the close of the war, except an occasional feast obtained on the march in the rich valleys of Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee. The horses were made to feel that they had friends when the artillerists had access to provender. Such feasts were few and far between. Lieutenant Doncaster's adventure. After the surrender of Vicksburg, Miss., Pemberton's army was paroled, and at Enterprise, Miss., the troops were furnished a thirty days furlough and instructed to report at the end of that time at such places as the commanding General had designated. About twenty-five members of the Third Maryland
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 77 (search)
e epaulement of a twenty-four pound smooth bore, with a detail worn out to the last stage of usefulness. One boy laid down on the ground, telling his sergeant that he could not lift his spade, much less dirt. The sergeant reported him to me as insubordinate, so I went to see what was the matter. The boy frankly said he was starving, and his pale face, seen in the light of the moon, told the truth more emphatically than his voice. I thought of that boy's mother, away off in the hills of Alabama, that perhaps at that moment was praying for the life of her child, whose right foot edged the grave, and that was awaiting the order to forward march from the King of the shadowland. I had a hard biscuit in my pocket that had lain there for the coming hour, when we were to cut our way out. I placed it in his hand. He looked at it, and at me, then burst into a flood of tears, and whispered faintly, Is this for me? I never saw him more, but I hope that fair-faced boy reached home to give
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