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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,742 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1,016 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 996 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 274 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 180 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 164 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 142 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Alabama (Alabama, United States) or search for Alabama (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 14 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
Arsenal, Georgia (about)3,00028,000 Mount Vernon Arsenal, Alabama2,000 20,000 Baton Rouge Arsenal, Louisiana2,00027,000 —–on was at once turned to the production of nitre in North Alabama and in Tennessee—in the latter State under the energetic st Point, and at that moment professor in the University of Alabama, was selected to go abroad and secure them. He left Montgction in Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama. To this end, contracts were made with iron-masters in thicts, especially in East Tennessee, North Carolina, and North Alabama, had to show much firmness in their dealings with the tneral exploration of the mountain regions from Virginia to Alabama, with the hope of finding new deposits of lead. One of thwho had for some years been professor in the University of Alabama, was selected and placed in charge of this delicate and imhe United States, stretching link by link from Virginia to Alabama. Our people are justly proud of the valor and constancy o<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Small arms. (search)
Small arms. At the formation of the government, or at the beginning of the war, the arms at command were distributed as follows, as nearly as I can recollect: Rifles.Muskets. At Richmond, Va. (about)4,000 Fayetteville Arsenal, North Carolina (about)2,00025,000 Charleston Arsenal, South Carolina (about)2,000 20,000 Augusta Arsenal, Georgia (about)3,00028,000 Mount Vernon Arsenal, Alabama2,000 20,000 Baton Rouge Arsenal, Louisiana2,00027,000 —–—– 15,000120,000 There were at Richmond about 60, 000 old, worthless flint muskets, and at Baton Rouge about 10,000 old Hall's rifles and carbines. Besides the foregoing, there were at Little Rock, Ark., a few thousand stands, and some few at the Texas arsenals, increasing the aggregate of serviceable arms to, say, 143,000. To these must be added the arms owned by the several States and by military organizations throughout the country, giving, say, 150,000 in all for the use of the armies of the Confederacy. The rifles w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Arsenals, workshops, foundries, etc. (search)
Fort Sumter. The entire product of one large Northern mill was being received at a Southern port. Of course all the ports were soon sealed to such importations from the North. Attention was at once turned to the production of nitre in North Alabama and in Tennessee—in the latter State under the energetic supervision of its Ordnance Department. An adequate supply of sulphur was found in New Orleans, where large quantities were in store to be used in sugar-refining. The entire stock was se had to be learned. As to a further supply of arms, steps had been taken by the President to import these and other ordnance stores from Europe; and Major Caleb Huse, a graduate of West Point, and at that moment professor in the University of Alabama, was selected to go abroad and secure them. He left Montgomery under instructions early in April, with a credit of 10,000 (!) from Mr. Memminger. The appointment proved a happy one; for he succeeded, with a very little money, in buying a good
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Progress of manufacture. (search)
ion. To obtain the iron needed for cannon and projectiles, it became necessary to stimulate its production in Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama. To this end, contracts were made with iron-masters in these States on liberal terms, and advances of money made to them, to be refunded in products. These contal consumption of nitre. It was a rude, wild sort of service; and the officers in charge of these districts, especially in East Tennessee, North Carolina, and North Alabama, had to show much firmness in their dealings with the turbulent people among whom, and by whose aid, they worked. It is a curious fact that the district on whconstituted our reserves, for final conflict. We had not omitted to have a pretty thorough, though general exploration of the mountain regions from Virginia to Alabama, with the hope of finding new deposits of lead. One of the earliest of these searches was made by Dr. Maupin, of the University of Virginia. No favorable result
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Central laboratory. (search)
all the laboratories, invested with authority to inspect and supervise their manipulations and materials. To this end Lieutenant-Colonel Mallet, a chemist and scientist of distinction, who had for some years been professor in the University of Alabama, was selected and placed in charge of this delicate and important duty. I attribute much of the improvement in our ammunition to this happy selection. A more earnest and capable officer I cannot imagine. What a set of men we would have had afUnited States and unsurpassed by any across the ocean, and a chain of arsenals, armories and laboratories equal in their capacity and their improved appointments to the best of those in the United States, stretching link by link from Virginia to Alabama. Our people are justly proud of the valor and constancy of the troops which bore their banners bravely in the front of the enemy; but they will also reflect that these creations of skill and labor were the monuments which represented the patien
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
for our work in a way which the following correspondence will explain: Washington, D. C., February 6, 1884. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary of the Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va. My Dear Sir,—I have just obtained a very interesting and valuable document—being the original Constitution for the Provisional Government of the Confederate States of America, bearing date February 8, 1861, and signed by the representatives of the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisana and Texas, and it affords me pleasure to present it to your Society, which seems to me to be the proper custodian of such a relic. I forward the document by Adams's Express Company to-day, and remain, Very truly yours, W. W. Corcoran. office Southern Historical Society, No. 7, Library Floor State Capitol, Richmond, Va., February 7, 1884, W W. Corcoran. Esq., Vice-President Southern Historical Society for District of Columbia. My Dear Sir.—I have to-day re<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 39 (search)
son. Barret's (Missouri) Battery. Le Gardeur's (Louisiana) Battery.( Not mentioned in the reports, but in Reserve Artillery August 31st, and Captain Le Gardeur, &c., relieved from duty in Army of Tennessee November 1st, 1863.) Havis's (Alabama) Battery. Lumsden's (Alabama) Battery. Massenburg's (Georgia) Battery. Cavalry. from return of August 31st, 1863, and reports. Major-General Joseph Wheeler. Wharton's division. Brigadier-General John A. Wharton. First briAlabama) Battery. Massenburg's (Georgia) Battery. Cavalry. from return of August 31st, 1863, and reports. Major-General Joseph Wheeler. Wharton's division. Brigadier-General John A. Wharton. First brigade. Colonel C. C. Crews. Seventh Alabama. Second Georgia. Third Georgia. Fourth Georgia, Colonel I. W. Avery. Second brigade. Colonel T. Harrison. Third Confederate, Colonel W. N. Estes. First Kentucky, Lieutenant Colonel J. W. Griffith. Fourth Tennessee, Colonel Paul F. Anderson. Eighth Texas. Eleventh Texas. White's (Georgia) Battery. Martin's division. Brigadier-General W. T. Martin. First brigade. Colonel J. T. Morgan. First Alabama. Third Alabama, Lieutenant-Co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last chapter in the history of Reconstruction in South Carolina. (search)
so large a portion of the citizens were disfranchised, the white people would register, but not vote. For a long time the poll-returns which were published made it likely that less than half of the registered names had voted, and that the call of the convention would be a failure; but the governing power was determined that their designs should not be thwarted, even by means provided by their own orders. A striking illustration was shown in the case of the adoption of the constitution of Alabama. The Congress resolved that it had been adopted, when it had been notoriously rejected. General Canby's act was by no means so glaring, but it was highly suspicious. After publishing the state of the polls for some time, by which it appeared that the convention had not been called, he ceased the continuance of the publication as unnecessary, and proclaimed that a majority of registered voters had ordered a convention, and published the names of the members-elect. The convention assemb
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
arolina, Ferguson commander. Houel's Battery, Georgia, Houel commander. Bledsoe's Battery, Missouri, Bledsoe commander. Le Gardeau Battery, Louisiana, Le Gardeau commander. Hoping I have not tresspassed upon your time, or asked too much of you, I am, dear sir, Yours respectfully, Joseph Palmer. we take pleasure in publishing the following from the gallant Colonel R. A. Hardaway, concerning the Artillery Organization of the Army of Northern Virginia: University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, May, 3, 1884. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society . Dear Sir,—In the January and February (double) number of the South-Ern Historical Society papers is published Organization of the Army of Northern Virginia, August 31, 1864. Corrections earnestly solicited if errors are found. I do not see the papers, not being a subscriber. This number was kindly lent me by Mrs. Gorgas. In the Artillery of Second corps, Brown's battalion, Colonel J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Sherman's march from Atlanta to the coast-address before the survivors' Association of Augusta, Ga., April 20th, 1884. (search)
for the defence of a sub-district. Isolated in position and cut off from all avenues of succor, each drop of shed blood flowed from her single arm, every feather which warmed and sheltered her offspring was plucked from her own breast. Lieutenant-General E. Kirby Smith, commanding the TransMississippi Department, was capable of no demonstrations which would compel the recall of the formidable reinforcements hastening to the relief of General Thomas. Such was the scarcity of troops in Alabama and Mississippi, that Lietenant-General Richard Taylor could detach but a handful in aid of Generals Cobb and Smith, who, with the Georgia State forces, were concentrated in the vicinity of Griffin. Lieutenant-General Hardee could muster forces barely sufficient to constitute respectable garrisons for the fixed batteries on the coasts of Georgia and South Carolina. General Beauregard looked in vain throughout the length and breadth of his extensive military division of the West for the mea
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