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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,742 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1,016 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 996 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 274 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 180 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 164 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 142 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Alabama (Alabama, United States) or search for Alabama (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sergeant Smith Prentiss and his career. (search)
as to where his strength chiefly lay. My own opinion is that it was as a jurist that mostly excelled; that it consisted in knowing and being able to show to others what was the law. I state the opinion with some diffidence, and, did it rest on my judgment alone, should not hazard it at all. But the eminent Chief Justice of the high court of errors and appeals of Mississippi thought that Prentiss appeared to most advantage before that court, and a distinguished judge of the Supreme Court of Alabama, who had heard him before the chancellor of Mississippi, expressed to me the opinion that his talents shone most conspicuously in that forum. These were men who could be led from a fair judgment of a legal argument by mere oratory, about as readily as old Playfair could be turned from a true criticism upon a mathematical treatise by its being burnished over with extracts from Fourth of July harangues. Had brilliant declamation been his only or chief faculty, there were plenty of his compe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.4 (search)
ands of the Federals landed and crossed the Tennessee river below Tuscumbia, in the extreme northwestern part of the State of Alabama. They made their way up the valley, driving back the small cavalry force of the Confederates which was in their front; the Confederates then being scattered over the whole north line of Alabama. When Town creek was reached Forrest made a stand, having received some reinforcements of cavalry, and with Ferrell's Battery and a section of Freman's Battery. The cooung lady who piloted us to the ford was Miss Emma Sansom, and for her services on this occasion the General Assembly of Alabama at the session of 1864, by joint resolution, directed the Governor of the State to issue a patent to her of 160 acres ofnd also to have prepared, with a suitable inscription thereon, a gold medal, and present the same in the name of the State of Alabama to her. See Acts of 1864. After crossing Black creek we passed on near by the town of Gadsden, and a few miles ea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The charge of the Crater. (search)
of battle. He quickly discovered the danger of this, as it would have afforded shelter for another assaulting column. He stopped the burial detail and made them level the ground, as they found it. General Pendleton, Chief of Artillery of General Lee's army, was standing near, and paid a high compliment to Mahone's foresight. The last act in the great battle. This was the last act in this celebrated battle—a battle won by the charge of three small brigades of Virginia, Georgia and Alabama troops, numbering less than 2,000 muskets, with the aid of the artillery, which rendered effective service to the charging columns, over an army of 70,000 men behind breast-works, which surrendered to this small force nineteen flags. General B. R. Johnson, who commanded the lines which were broken by the explosion and upheaval of the Crater, in his report of the battle, said: To the able commander and gallant officers and men of Mahone's Division, to whom we are mainly indebted for the r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
urces, a mass of hitherto unpublished information of curious interest and value, relative to the operations of the Confederate privateer Shenandoah. In destructiveness to Union property, the work of the Shenandoah was second only to that of the Alabama, and the former enjoyed the peculiar distinction of having far outstripped the records of all other cruisers in the length of her voyage, and the fact that she never met with the slightest opposition from Union arms in her path of destruction, at, for Madeira. Ten days later she was delivered over to her new commander, Lieut. James J. Waddell, who had taken passage from Liverpool with the officers and men detailed for his command. Among the latter were some picked men from the famous Alabama, which had been sunk by the Kearsage a few months before. The Shenandoah was commissioned on October 19th, and that day cleared for Madeira. The journal of Commander Waddell is now in possession of the Navy Department, and it is a most inter
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
t, which constantly shared its fortunes through it all—thence again to the lines at Petersburg, and down to the end. The next fighting done by the brigade was as a part of Early's command in that truly great march on Washington city. The brigade was in all the battles of that command, and made the flank movement with Gordon's Division at Bell Grove and Cedar Creek. In this battle it had a hand-to-hand conflict with the 6th Army Corps. It captured, with the aid of Battle's Brigade, of Alabama, six pieces of artillery, which were gallantly defended by the artillerymen, who died at their posts rather than surrender. The brigade was ordered to take position in front of Middleburg, where it remained during the day, having skirmished with cavalry in front. That evening General Sheridan, having taken command of the Federal troops, made his attack on the left flank of the Confederate line. The brigade was in position where it could see the line as it broke, first at the point held b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
was a member of a prominent and wealthy family of Maryland, who had come over with Lord Baltimore, and settled in St. Mary's county, Maryland. His father was Raphael Semmes, uncle of the world-renowned Confederate Admiral, and commander of the Alabama. On the maternal side, Mr. Semmes' family were Welsh-Catholic. His grandfathers were both extensive land owners in Charles county, Maryland. Speaking of his mother, Mr. Semmes said: She was a woman of great variety of information and sweeto me, said the loyal old Southerner, and he can stay at my farm and be known as the uncle of my children. But in a few days Mr. Knox sent word to his daughter that concealment was impossible; that it was known everywhere that Mr. Semmes was in Alabama and that he would join her in her father's house. This was already occupied by Yankee soldiers, but they were very courteous and kind to us, said Mrs. Semmes. Speaking of the surrender, Mr. Semmes said: Though the sword was surrendered we
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
Imprisoned under fire. [from the Richmond, Va., times, August 22, 1897.] Six hundred gallant Confederate officers on Morris Island, S. C., in reach of Confederate guns. They were held in retaliation, and two of them relate the experiences of prison Life—Stories of Captain F. C. Barnes and Captain R. E. Frayser. A list of the officers under fire, as above, including those as well from Maryland, North Carolina, Texas, Mississippi, South Carolina, Florida, Alabama, Missouri, Kentucky, and Tennessee, has been given in Vol. XVII, Southern Historical Society Papers, pp. 34-46, but as the list from Virginia herewith is more complete and definitely descriptive, it is meet that it should be printed now. Further and graphic experience of the hardships, sufferings and hazards of the Six Hundred, is given in the narrative of Colonel Abram Fulkerson, of the 63d Tennessee infantry, Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XXII, pp. 127-146.—Editor. During the seige of Charles
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Index. Abbeville, S. C., Distinguished men of, 56. Alabama Heroine, An, 45. Alexandria, Retrocession of, 197. Allen, Major, Wm., 139. Ambulance Corps, The Richmond, Members of, 113. Anderson, General Joseph R., 211. Appomattox, Surrender at, 20, 263. Archer, Colonel Fletcher H., 12. Ashford, Col., John, 257. Atkinson, Col., John Wilder, 38, 139. Averill, Col. J. H., 267. Baldwin, Joseph G , 22. Barlow, Captain J. W., 139. Barker, Capt. F. C., 366. Barnes, Genf, 160, 171, 209, 234. Colston, Gen. R. E., Tribute to, 346; Ode by, 352. Confederate Cause, The, 21, 357. Confederate Dead, The, Poem by A. C. Gordon, 382. Confederate Forces, Total of, 308. Confederate Navy, The Shenandoah, 116; Alabama, Florida, 126. Council, Col J. C., 12. Cowardin, Lieut. John L., 139. Crater, Charge at the, 285. Crutchfield's Artillery Brigade; Operations of April, 1865, 38, 139, 285. Cumberland Grays, 21st Va. Infantry, Roster and Record of,