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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,742 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1,016 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 996 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 274 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 180 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 164 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 142 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Alabama (Alabama, United States) or search for Alabama (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dedication of a bronze tablet in honor of Botetourt Battery (search)
with lasting value depicting a type of the action and feeling that characterized the Confederate soldier—to be valued and treasured as a tribute to his courage, constancy, fidelity and fortitude, in facing and enduring peril and privation. The address. This is the history of the only Virginia troops engaged in the defense of Vicksburg, upon the battleground preserved in the amber of this great military park. Fighting for the South were many gallant Mississippians, and regiments from Alabama and Georgia, from the Carolinas, Tennessee, Arkansas and Missouri, Texas and Louisiana. On the other side, fighting for the North, were Massachusetts and New York, Illinois, Indiana and Iowa, Wisconsin, Ohio, Minnesota and Michigan. These hundred or more men, this company known as the Botetourt Artillery, were the only Virginians. It is to them that this stone is raised, and it is to their war song that we listen to-day. They were born, these men, in the State of Virginia, in the Coun
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
together in heroic sacrifice, and no more wonderful magnetic tie ever existed than that between those Southern officers and their slaves. One of those gentlemen was my intimate friend and companion and roommate, Colonel I. G. W. Steadman, of Alabama. I do not recall his regiment. His brother, a lieutenant in the same regiment, was also a prisoner there. Colonel Steadman's negro was named George. He waited on us and was untiring in his efforts to do anything in his power for our comfort.y? I asked. Get out of here, you d——fool nigger, and rot in prison, and now, master, here I am, and I am going to stay here as long as you stays, if I starve and rot. The officers captured at Port Hudson were from Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, I think. There were thirteen negroes, all of whom remained faithful to the end, and although we had barely enough to eat to keep us alive, we divided equally with our servants. I am glad to be able to record the name of Pen, who was one o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The cruise of the Shenandoah. (search)
of Confederate property, the C. S. S. Shenandoah, was surrendered to the British nation by letter to Earl Russell, from Captain Waddell, through Captain Paynter, royal navy, commanding H. M. S. Donegal. The gallant little ship had left London thirteen months before as the Sea King , and had, as a Confederate cruiser, defied pursuit, for twelve months and seventeen days, had captured thirty-eight vessels valued at $1,172,223, bonding six and destroying thirty-two—second only to the C. S. S. Alabama in number; had circumnavigated the globe, carrying the brave flag around the world and into every ocean on the globe except the Antarctic; traveling over a distance of about 60,000 miles, without the loss of a single spar. Captain Waddell's letter to Earl Russell set forth the unvarnished facts and work of our cruise and surrendered the vessel to the British nation. The Shenandoah was placed under custody of British authorities, the gunboat Goshawk being lashed alongside. United S
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
S. C.—Landsman; served on steamer Albemarle in battle of Plymouth, N. C., and in battle with U. S. fleet in Sound. Thomas S. Garrett, Washington, D. C.—Born in Alabama; midshipman U. S. N., and midshipman C. S. N.; served on receiving ship St. Philip and steamers Pamlico, Gaines and Morgan. Robert Hunt, Louisville, Ky.—Seamanter; in Minor's boat expedition to Plymouth, N. C.; cruiser Chickamauga. M. W. McCoy, Evansville, Ind.—Sergeant of marines, served on C. S. cruisers Sumter and Alabama. A. F. Marmelstien, Savannah, Ga.—Enrolled at Louisville Reunion; signal officer Confederate States steamer Alabama, also second officer privateer Tuscaloosa. n; served on steamer North Carolina, and with Captain Woods in the capture of United States gunboat Underwriter. Augustus—O. Wright, Jacksonville, Fla.—Born in Alabama; midshipman U. S. N., passed midshipman C. S. N.; served on Savannah Station, and schoolship Patrick Henry. Elsbury V. White, Norfolk, Va.—Engineer C.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.66 (search)
Fletcher, John (Capt.), was killed at Buckton in 1862. Fletcher, Joshua C. (Second sergt.), was badly hurt in a charge in November, 1864. Fletcher, Clinton, killed at Greenland Gap (West Virginia Raid). Foster, Wm., still living; was a captain in Mosby's Battalion at the close of the war. Francis, George W., living in Moundsville, Va. Foley, Oswald, killed at Kelley's Island, 1861. Geiman, Jess C. (Ord. Sergt.), lives at Bloomfield, Va. Gibson, Gurley, still living in Alabama. Glasscock, Robt., died since the war. Grigsby, Bushrod, died since the war. Glasscock, Samuel, died since the war. Glasscock, Alfred (Third Lieut.), died since the war. Glasscock, Thomas, still living at Paris, Va. Garrison, Bushrod, lost a foot in threshing machine, and died since the war. Garrison, Tip, died since the war; was wounded at Kelley's Island. Grigsby, Nat, wounded at Upperville, Va., June 27, 1863, and died. Gilmore, Howard, lost sight of as joined