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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 68 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 30 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 24 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 14 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 12 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 8 0 Browse Search
Antiphon, Speeches (ed. K. J. Maidment) 6 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). You can also browse the collection for Lesbos (Greece) or search for Lesbos (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 11, line 1 (search)
sad rivers swelled with their own tears— naiads and dryads with dishevelled hair wore garments of dark color. His torn limbs were scattered in strange places. Hebrus then received his head and harp—and, wonderful! While his loved harp was floating down the stream, it mourned for him beyond my power to tell. His tongue though lifeless, uttered a mournful sound and mournfully the river's banks replied: onward borne by the river to the sea they left their native stream and reached the shore of Lesbos at Methymna. Instantly, a furious serpent rose to attack the head of Orpheus, cast up on that foreign sand— the hair still wet with spray. Phoebus at last appeared and saved the head from that attack: before the serpent could inflict a sting, he drove it off, and hardened its wide jaws to rigid stone. Meanwhile the fleeting shade of Orpheus had descended under earth: remembering now those regions that he saw when there before, he sought Eurydice through fields frequented by the blest; and wh<
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 13, line 98 (search)
hing of a girl, when, as he held a shield and spear, I said ‘Son of a goddess! Pergama but waits to fall by you, why do you hesitate to assure the overthrow of mighty Troy?’ With these bold words, I laid my hand on him— and to: brave actions I sent forth the brave: his deeds of Bravery are therefore mine it was my power that conquered Telephus, as he fought with his lance; it was through me that, vanquished and suppliant? he at last was healed. I caused the fall of Thebes; believe me, I took Lesbos, Tenedos, Chryse and Cilla— the cities of Apollo; and I took Scyros; think too, of the Lyrnesian wall as shaken by my hand, destroyed, and thrown down level with the ground. Let this suffice: I found the man who caused fierce Hector's death, through me the famous Hector now, lies low! And for those arms which made Achilles known I now demand these arms. To him alive I gave them—at his death they should be mine. “After the grief of one had reached all Greece, and ships a thousand, fille