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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 12 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 10 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 8 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 6 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 4 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 4 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Aegean or search for Aegean in all documents.

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Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
p when he stood for port; and Aegeus, seeing from the acropolis the ship with a black sail, supposed that Theseus had perished; so he cast himself down and died.Compare Diod. 4.61.6ff.; Plut. Thes. 22; Paus. 1.22.5; Hyginus, Fab. 43; Serv. Verg. A. 3.74; Scriptores rerum mythicarum Latini, ed. Bode, i. p. 117 (Second Vatican Mythographer 125). The three Latin writers say that Aegeus threw himself into the sea, which was hence called the Aegean after him. The Greek writers say that he cast himself down from the rock of the acropolis. Pausanius describes the exact point from which he fell, to wit the lofty bastion at the western end of the acropolis, on which in after ages the elegant little temple of Wingless Victory stood and still stands. It commands a wonderful view over the ports of Athens and away across the sea to Aegina and the coast of Peloponnese, looming clear and blue throu
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
ish by the hand of Pelops. Pelops, therefore, got Hippodamia; and on his journey, in which he was accompanied by Myrtilus, he came to a certain place, and withdrew a little to fetch water for his wife, who was athirst; and in the meantime Myrtilus tried to rape her.Compare Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 156; Scholiast on Hom. Il. ii.104. The latter writer says, somewhat absurdly, that the incident took place when Pelops and Hippodamia were crossing the Aegean Sea, and that, Hippodamia being athirst, Pelops dismounted from the chariot to look for water in the desert. But when Pelops learned that from her, he threw Myrtilus into the sea, called after him the Myrtoan Sea, at Cape GeraestusCompare Eur. Or. 989ff.; and Myrtilus, as he was being thrown, uttered curses against the house of Pelops. When Pelops had reached the Ocean and been cleansed by Hephaestus,Compare Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 15