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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 12 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 10 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 8 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 6 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 4 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 4 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge). You can also browse the collection for Aegean or search for Aegean in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1 (search)
Poseidon From the depths of salt Aegean floods I, Poseidon, have come, where choirs of Nereids dance in a graceful maze; for since the day that Phoebus and I with exact measurement set towers of stone about this land of Troy and ringed it round, never from my heart has passed away a kindly feeling for my Phrygian town, which now is smouldering and overthrown, a prey to Argive might. For, from his home beneath Parnassus, Phocian Epeus, aided by the craft of Pallas, framed a horse to bear within its womb an armed army, and sent it within the battlements, a deadly statue;[from which in days to come men shall tell of the Wooden Horse, with its hidden load of warriors.] Groves stand forsaken and temples of the gods run down with blood, and at the altar's very base, before the god who watched his home, Priam lies dead. While to Achaean ships great store of gold and Phrygian spoils are being conveyed, and they who came against this town, those sons of Hellas, only wait a favoring breeze
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 48 (search)
sail from Ilium for their homes. On them will Zeus also send his rain and fearful hail, and inky tempests from the sky; and he promises to grant me his thunder-bolts to hurl on the Achaeans and fire their ships. And you, for your part, make the Aegean strait to roar with mighty billows and whirlpools, and fill Euboea's hollow bay with corpses, that Achaeans may learn henceforth to reverence my temples and regard all other deities. Poseidon So shall it be, for this favor needs only a few wordneeds only a few words. I will vex the broad Aegean sea; and the beach of Myconos and the reefs round Delos, Scyros and Lemnos too, and the cliffs of Caphareus shall be strewn with many a corpse. You go to Olympus, and taking from your father's hand his lightning bolts, keep careful watch against the hour when Argos' army lets slip its cables. A fool is he who sacks the towns of men, with shrines and tombs, the dead man's hallowed home, for at the last he makes a desert round himself and dies.
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1100 (search)
Chorus Oh may the sacred blazing thunderbolt of the Aegean, hurled in might, smite the ship of Menelaus full in the middle, on its way in mid-sea, since he is carrying me away in bitter sorrow from the shores of Ilium to be a slave in Hellas, while the daughter of Zeus still keeps her golden mirrors, delight of maidens' hearts. Never may he reach his home in Laconia or his father's hearth and home, nor come to the town of Pitane Part of Sparta was so called. or the temple of the goddess Athena of “the Brazen House,” a temple on the acropolis. with the gates of bronze, having taken as his captive the one whose marriage brought disgrace on Hellas through its length and breadth and woful anguish on the streams of Sim