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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 94 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 74 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 54 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 44 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 34 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 24 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 18 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 16 0 Browse Search
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Andocides, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Polybius, Histories. You can also browse the collection for Euboea (Greece) or search for Euboea (Greece) in all documents.

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Polybius, Histories, book 2, Antigonus Doson at the Isthmus (search)
the league to conclude the terms of the treatyThe treaty, besides securing the surrender of the Acrocorinthus, provided that no embassy should be sent to any other king without the consent of Antigonus, and that the Achaeans should supply food and pay for the Macedonian army of relief. Solemn sacrifices and games were also established in his honour, and kept up long after his death at Sicyon, see 28, 19; 30, 23. Plutarch, Arat. 45. The conduct of Aratus in thus bringing the Macedonians into the Peloponnese has been always attacked (see Plut. Cleom. 16). It is enough here to say that our judgment as to it must depend greatly on our view of the designs and character of Cleomenes. and marched to the Isthmus with his army by way of Euboea. He took this route because the Aetolians, after trying other expedients for preventing Antigonus bringing this aid, now forbade his marching south of Thermopylae with an army, threatening that, if he did, they would offer armed opposition to his passage.
Polybius, Histories, book 4, Philip Returns To the Peloponnese (search)
n defiance of the customs and principles of mankind. After those, and other similar achievements, Dorimachus returned home. But the winter being now considerably advanced, and allPhilip starts again. idea of the king coming being given up owing to the time of the year, Philip suddenly started from Larisa with an army of three thousand hoplites armed with brass shields, two thousand light-armed, three hundred Cretans, and four hundred horse of the royal guard; and having transported them into Euboea and thence to Cynos he came through Boeotia and the Megarid to Corinth, about the time of the winter solstice; having conducted his arrival with such promptitude and secrecy, that not a single Peloponnesian suspected it. Dec. B. C. 219. He at once closed the gates of Corinth and secured the roads by guards; and on the very next day sent for Aratus the elder to come to him from Sicyon, and issued despatches to the Strategus of the Achaean league and the cities, in which he named a time and pl
Polybius, Histories, book 10, Reinforcements Sent to Various Cities (search)
patched a body of men to the islanders to garrison their city; and at the same time despatched Polyphontes with an adequate force into Phocis and Boeotia; and Menippus, with a thousand peltasts and five hundred Agrianes to Chalcis and the rest of Euboea; while he himself advanced to Scotusa, and sent word at the same time to the Macedonians to meet him at that town. But when he learnt that Attalus had sailed into the port of Nicaea, and that the leaders of the Aetolians were collecting at Heracl with the light-armed troops and the royal guard, went to Demetrias, and there remained, waiting to see what the enemy would attempt. To secure that he should be kept perfectly acquainted with all their movements, he sent messengers to the Peparethii, and to his troops in Phocis and Euboea, and ordered them to telegraph to him everything which happened, by means of fire signals directed to Mount Tisaeum, which is a mountain of Thessaly conveniently situated for commanding a view of those places.
Polybius, Histories, book 11, Dangers of the Treaty With Rome (search)
ment and ruin of Greece. That is the tale told by your treaty with Rome, which formerly existed only in written words, but is now seen in full operation. Heretofore, though mere written words, it was a disgrace to you: but now your execution of it has made that disgrace palpable to the eyes of all the world. Moreover, Philip merely lends his name and serves as a pretext for the war: he is not exposed to any attack: it is against his allies,—the majority of the Peloponnesian states, Boeotia, Euboea, Phocis, Locris, Thessaly, Epirus,—that you have made this treaty, bargaining that their bodies and their goods shall belong to the Romans, their cities and their territory to the Aetolians. Cp. 9. 39. And though personally, if you took a city, you would not stoop to violate the freeborn, or to burn the buildings, because you look upon such conduct as cruel and barbarous; yet you have made a treaty by which you have handed over all other Greeks to the barbarians, to be exposed to the most sh