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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 132 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 126 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 114 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 88 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 68 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 32 0 Browse Search
Lycurgus, Speeches 20 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 12 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Andria: The Fair Andrian (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), The Eunuch (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10. You can also browse the collection for Attica (Greece) or search for Attica (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 12 document sections:

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Demosthenes, Olynthiac 1, section 15 (search)
Seriously, is anyone here so foolish as not to see that our negligence will transfer the war from Chalcidice to Attica? Yet if that comes to pass, I am afraid, men of Athens, that just as men who borrow money recklessly at high interest enjoy a temporary accommodation only to forfeit their estates in the end, so we may find that we have paid a heavy price for our indolence, ando borrow money recklessly at high interest enjoy a temporary accommodation only to forfeit their estates in the end, so we may find that we have paid a heavy price for our indolence, and because we consult our own pleasure in everything, may hereafter come to be forced to do many of the dfficult things for which we had no liking, and may finally endanger our possessions here in Attica itself.
Demosthenes, Olynthiac 1, section 27 (search)
But indeed I think you want no speech to prove how vast is the difference between a war here and a war yonder. Why, if you were obliged to take the field yourselves for a bare month, drawing from Attica the necessary supplies—I am assuming that there is no enemy in this country—I suppose your farmers would lose more than the sum spent upon the whole of the previous war.The war about Amphipolis. Demosthenes reckons its cost at 1500 talents (Dem. 2.28). But if war comes within our borders, at what figure must we assess our losses? And you must add the insolence of the enemy and the ignominy of our position, greater than any loss in a wise man's esti
Demosthenes, Olynthiac 3, section 8 (search)
What remains then, men of Athens, but to help them with all your power and energy? I see no alternative. For, quite apart from the disgrace that we should incur if we shirk our responsibilities, I see not a little danger, men of Athens, for the future, if the Thebans maintain their present attitude towards us, and the Phocians have come to the end of their money, and there is nothing to hinder Philip, when he has crushed his present foe, from turning his arms against Attica.
Demosthenes, On the Peace, section 16 (search)
If we went to war again with the Thebans about OropusOropus was in Attica, close to the Boeotian frontier. A war for its possession would therefore be confined to the Thebans and the Athenians, and Demosthenes has no fear of the result. or for some other private reason, I do not think we should suffer, for both their allies and ours would, of course, offer support, if their own territory were invaded, but would not join either side in aggression. That is the way with every alliance worth considering, and such is the natural result.
Demosthenes, Philippic 2, section 35 (search)
to remind each one of you, however clearly he knows it, who it is that persuaded you to abandon the Phocians and Thermopylae, the command of which gave Philip the command also of the road to Attica and the Peloponnesus, and who it is that has forced you to take counsel, not for your rights and interests abroad, but for your possessions here at home and for the war in Attica, a ylae, the command of which gave Philip the command also of the road to Attica and the Peloponnesus, and who it is that has forced you to take counsel, not for your rights and interests abroad, but for your possessions here at home and for the war in Attica, a war which will bring distress on every one of us, when it does come, but which really dates from that very day.
Demosthenes, Philippic 2, section 36 (search)
For if you had not been hoodwinked then, there would be no anxiety in Athens, because Philip could never, of course, have gained command of the sea and reached Attica with his fleet, nor could he have marched past Thermopylae and Phocis, but either he would have acted fairly and observed the Peace by keeping quiet, or he would have been instantly engaged in a war similar to that which made him so anxious for the Peace.
Demosthenes, On the Chersonese, section 7 (search)
For we have no choice in the matter, but there remains the most righteous and most necessary task of all, which these gentlemen deliberately pass over in silence. What then is that task? To defend ourselves against the aggressor. Or perhaps they mean that if Philip keeps his hands off Attica and the Piraeus, he is neither injuring our city nor provoking hostilities.
Demosthenes, On the Chersonese, section 8 (search)
But if they ground their plea upon this principle, if this is their interpretation of the peace, it is obvious to all that their argument is assuredly impious and intolerable and dangerous to Athens; and it follows besides that their own words flatly contradict their indictment of Diopithes. For why on earth are we to give Philip leave to do everything else, provided he keeps clear of Attica, while Diopithes is not allowed to help the Thracians, or else we shall have to admit that he is starting a war?
Demosthenes, On the Chersonese, section 18 (search)
what seasonThe season of the Etesian winds; see Dem. 8.14. of the year is upon us—the season at which certain people think it their duty to keep the Hellespont clear of you and hand it over to Philip? What if he quits Thrace and never approaches the Chersonese or Byzantium—for you must take that also into your reckoning—but turns up at Chalcis and Megara, just as he did at Oreus not long ago? Will it be better to make our stand here and let the war spread to Attica, or to contrive some employment for him away yonder? I prefer the la
Demosthenes, On the Chersonese, section 36 (search)
have you neither liberated Euboea nor regained any of your lost possessions? On the other hand, while you stay at home, at leisure and in health”—(if indeed they could say that men who behave thus are in health)—“Philip has set up two despots in Euboea, entrenching one right over against Attica and the other as a menace t
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