hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 14 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 12 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 8 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 8 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 4 0 Browse Search
Lycurgus, Speeches 4 0 Browse Search
Plato, Letters 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Aeschines, Speeches. You can also browse the collection for Macedon (Greece) or search for Macedon (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Aeschines, On the Embassy, section 152 (search)
And I myself, gentlemen, have three children, one daughter and two sons, by the daughter of Philodemus, the sister of Philon and Epicrates; and I have brought them into court with the others for the sake of asking one question and presenting one piece of evidence to the jury. This question I will now put to you; for I ask, fellow citizens, whether you believe that I would have betrayed to Philip, not only my country, my personal friendships, and my rights in the shrines and tombs of my fathers, but also these children, the dearest of mankind to me. Do you believe that I would have held his friendship more precious than the safety of these children? By what lust have you seen me conquered? What unworthy act have I ever done for money? It is not Macedon that makes men good or bad, but their own inborn nature; and we have not come back from the embassy changed men, but the same men that you yourselves sent out.
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 156 (search)
No! by Zeus and the gods, do not, my fellow citizens, do not, I beseech you, set up in the orchestra of Dionysus a memorial of your own defeat; do not in the presence of the Greeks convict the Athenian people of having lost their reason; do not remind the poor Thebans of their incurable and irreparable disasters, men who, exiled through Demosthenes' acts, found refuge with you, when their shrines and children and tombs had been destroyed by Demosthenes' taking of bribes and by the Persian gold.Aeschines assumes that Demosthenes' opposition to Macedon was paid for by the king of Persia.
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 239 (search)
But this same man, overtaken by the dangers which are now upon him,See on Aeschin. 3.132. sent, not at the request of the Athenians, but of his own accord, three hundred talents to the people, which they were wise enough to refuse. Now what brought the gold was the crisis, and his fear, and his need of allies. And this same thing it was that brought about the alliance with Thebes. But you, Demosthenes, tire us out with your everlasting talk of Thebes and of that most ill-starred alliance, while you are silent as to the seventy talents of the king's gold which you have seized and embezzled.It appears that when Athens refused the 300 talents which had been brought from the king of Persia to help in organizing a revolt against Alexander, the Persian envoys put at least a part of the gold into Demosthenes' hands, in the expectation that he would use it in unofficial efforts against Macedon.
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 254 (search)
And mark well the occasion on which you are casting your vote. A few days hence the Pythian games are to be celebrated and the synod of Hellas assembled. Our city is already the object of slander in consequence of the policies of Demosthenes in connection with the present critical situation.The recent revolt of Sparta against Macedonia and the present brilliant success of Alexander in Asia made the situation especially critical for Greece so far as any thought of opposition to Macedon was still cherished. It might well be expected that at the coming meeting of the Amphictyonic Council, or at a special synod of delegates from the Greek states held at the time of the Pythian games, complaint would be brought by the Macedonians against the Spartans and those who had encouraged them in breaking the peace. If you crown him, you will seem to be in sympathy with those who violate the general peace, whereas if you do the opposite, you will free the people from these charges.