hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 78 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 48 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 40 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 28 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 22 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 22 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 20 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray) 20 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Hecuba (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 16 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 16 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler). You can also browse the collection for Thrace (Greece) or search for Thrace (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 9, line 1 (search)
Thus did the Trojans watch. But Panic, comrade of blood-stained Rout, had taken fast hold of the Achaeans and their princes were all of them in despair. As when the two winds that blow from Thrace - the north and the northwest - spring up of a sudden and rouse the fury of the main [pontos] - in a moment the dark waves uprear their heads and scatter their sea-wrack in all directions - even thus troubled were the hearts of the Achaeans. The son of Atreus in dismay bade the heralds call the peopson of Atreus, give your orders, for you are the most royal among us all. Prepare a feast for your councilors; it is right and reasonable that you should do so; there is abundance of wine in your tents, which the ships of the Achaeans bring from Thrace daily over the sea [pontos]. You have everything at your disposal wherewith to entertain guests, and you have many subjects. When many are got together, you can be guided by him whose counsel is wisest - and sorely do we need shrewd and prudent c
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 10, line 526 (search)
ns, for old warrior though I am I never hold back by the ships, but I never yet saw or heard of such horses as these are. Surely some god must have met you and given them to you, for you are both of dear to Zeus, and to Zeus' daughter Athena." And Odysseus answered, "Nestor son of Neleus, honor to the Achaean name, heaven, if it so will, can give us even better horses than these, for the gods are far mightier than we are. These horses, however, about which you ask me, are freshly come from Thrace. Diomedes killed their king with the twelve bravest of his companions. Hard by the ships we took a thirteenth man - a scout whom Hektor and the other Trojans had sent as a spy upon our ships." He laughed as he spoke and drove the horses over the ditch, while the other Achaeans followed him gladly. When they reached the strongly built quarters of the son of Tydeus, they tied the horses with thongs of leather to the manger, where the steeds of Diomedes stood eating their sweet grain, but Ody
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 11, line 210 (search)
heeled round, and again met the Achaeans, while the Argives on their part strengthened their battalions. The battle was now in array and they stood face to face with one another, Agamemnon ever pressing forward in his eagerness to be ahead of all others. Tell me now you Muses that dwell in the mansions of Olympus, who, whether of the Trojans or of their allies, was first to face Agamemnon? It was Iphidamas son of Antenor, a man both brave and of great stature, who was brought up in fertile Thrace the mother of sheep. Kissês, his mother's father, brought him up in his own house when he was a child - Kissês, father to fair Theano. When he reached manhood, Kissês would have kept him there, and was for giving him his daughter in marriage, but as soon as he had married, he went away from the bride chamber, looking for glory [kleos] from the Achaeans. He came with twelve ships: these he had left at Perkote and had come on by land to Ilion. He it was that now met Agamemnon son of Atreus. Wh
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 13, line 1 (search)
Now when Zeus had thus brought Hektor and the Trojans to the ships, he left them to their never-ending toil [ponos], and turned his keen eyes away, looking elsewhere towards the horse-breeders of Thrace, the Mysians, fighters at close quarters, the noble Hippemolgoi, who live on milk, and the Abians, the most just [dikaioi] of humankind. He no longer turned so much as a glance towards Troy, for he did not think that any of the immortals would go and help either Trojans or Danaans. But King Poseidon had kept no blind look-out; he had been looking admiringly on the battle from his seat on the topmost crests of wooded Samothrace, whence he could see all Ida, with the city of Priam and the ships of the Achaeans. He had come from under the sea and taken his place here, for he pitied the Achaeans who were being overcome by the Trojans; and he was furiously angry with Zeus. Presently he came down from his post on the mountain top, and as he strode swiftly onwards the high hills and the f
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 13, line 266 (search)
ssing forward to a place in the front ranks. But let us no longer stay here talking like children, lest we be ill spoken of; go, fetch your spear from the tent at once." On this Meriones, peer of Ares, went to the tent and got himself a spear of bronze. He then followed after Idomeneus, big with great deeds of valor. As when baneful Ares sallies forth to battle, and his son Panic so strong and dauntless goes with him, to strike terror even into the heart of a hero - the pair have gone from Thrace to arm themselves among the Ephyroi or the brave Phlegyans, but they will not listen to both the contending hosts, and will give victory to one side or to the other - even so did Meriones and Idomeneus, leaders of men, go out to battle clad in their bronze armor. Meriones was first to speak. "Son of Deukalion," said he, "where would you have us begin fighting? On the right wing of the host, in the center, or on the left wing, where I take it the Achaeans will be weakest?" Idomeneus answere
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 20, line 438 (search)
and stern fate closed the eyes of Echeklos. Next in order the bronze point of his spear wounded Deukalion in the fore-arm where the sinews of the elbow are united, whereon he waited Achilles' onset with his arm hanging down and death staring him in the face. Achilles cut his head off with a blow from his sword and flung it helmet and all away from him, and the marrow came oozing out of his backbone as he lay. He then went in pursuit of Rhigmos, noble son of Peires, who had come from fertile Thrace, and struck him through the middle with a spear which fixed itself in his belly, so that he fell headlong from his chariot. He also speared Areithoos squire [therapôn] to Rhigmos in the back as he was turning his horses in flight, and thrust him from his chariot, while the horses were struck with panic. As a fire raging in some mountain glen after long drought - and the dense forest is in a blaze, while the wind carries great tongues of fire in every direction - even so furiously did Achil