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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson). You can also browse the collection for Cantabria (Spain) or search for Cantabria (Spain) in all documents.

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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 21 (search)
He conquered, however, partly in person, and partly by his lieutenants, Cantabria,Cantabria, in the north of Spain, now the Basque province. Aquitania and Pannonia,The ancient Pannonia includes Hungary and part of Austria, Styria and Carniola. Dalmatia, with all Illyricum and Rhaetia,The Rhaetian Alps are that part of the chain bordering on the Tyrol. besides the two Alpine nations, the Vindelici and the Salassii.The Vindelici principally occupied the country which is now the kingdom of BavariCantabria, in the north of Spain, now the Basque province. Aquitania and Pannonia,The ancient Pannonia includes Hungary and part of Austria, Styria and Carniola. Dalmatia, with all Illyricum and Rhaetia,The Rhaetian Alps are that part of the chain bordering on the Tyrol. besides the two Alpine nations, the Vindelici and the Salassii.The Vindelici principally occupied the country which is now the kingdom of Bavaria; and the Salassii, that part of Piedmont which includes the valley of Aost. He also checked the incursions of the Dacians, by cutting off three of their generals with vast armies, and drove the Germans beyond the river Elbe; removing two other tribes who submitted, the Ubii and Sicambri, into Gaul, and settling them in the country bordering on the Rhine. Other nations also, which broke into revolt, he reduced to submission. But he never made war upon any nation without just and necessary caus
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 79 (search)
During the whole course of his life, he suffered, at times, dangerous fits of sickness, especially after the conquest of Cantabria; when his liver being injured by a defluxion upon it, he was reduced to such a condition, that he was obliged to undergo a desperate and doubtful method of cure: for warm applications having no effect, Antonius MusaHis physician, mentioned c. lviii. directed the use of those which were cold. He was likewise subject to fits of sickness at stated times every year; for about his birth-daySeptember 21st, a sickly season at Rome. he was commonly a little indisposed. In the beginning of spring, he was attacked with an inflation of the midriff; and when the wind was southerly, with a cold in his head. By all these complaints, his constitution was so shattered, that he could not easily bear either heat or cold.
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Galba (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 8 (search)
ificing in a temple, a boy who attended with a censer, became all on a sudden grey-headed. This incident was regarded by some as a token of an approaching revolution in the government, and that an old man would succeed a young one: that is that he would succeed Nero. And not long after, a thunderbolt falling into a lake in Cantabria, It has been remarked before, that the Cantabria of the ancients is now the province of Biscay. twelve axes were found in it; a manifest sign of the supreme power.ificing in a temple, a boy who attended with a censer, became all on a sudden grey-headed. This incident was regarded by some as a token of an approaching revolution in the government, and that an old man would succeed a young one: that is that he would succeed Nero. And not long after, a thunderbolt falling into a lake in Cantabria, It has been remarked before, that the Cantabria of the ancients is now the province of Biscay. twelve axes were found in it; a manifest sign of the supreme power.