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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
lovely Catherine: Kill no more Pigeons than you can eat. Go constantly to meeting or to churchtill you get a good husband; then stay at home and nurse the children and live like a Christian. Some years after the Revolution, Colonel Ward was in Paris on a business errand. He kept a record of his stay there in a parchment pocket-book, where among technical entries are found brief comments on matters of general interest. One day the Colonel tells of a dinner party where he met Vergniaud and e to say he was innocent, and forgave his enemies. He behaved with the fortitude of a martyr. Santerre ordered the [executioner] to dispatch him. At twelve the streets were again all open. There is a tradition that when Colonel Ward quitted Paris, with a party of friends, the carriage was driven by a disguised nobleman, who thus escaped the guillotine. Our mother remembered him as a gentleman advanced in years, with courtly manner and mild blue eyes, which were, in spite of their mildn
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
her's chastened heart, He gave the Mother's watchful eye, He bids me live but where thou art, And look with earnest prayer on high. Then spake the angel of Mothers To me in gentle tone: “Be kind to the children of others And thus deserve thine own!” When, in the spring of 1844, she left Rome with husband, sister, and baby, it seemed, she says, like returning to the living world after a long separation from it. Journeying by way of Naples, Marseilles, Avignon, they came at length to Paris. Here Julia first saw Rachel, and Taglioni, the greatest of all dancers; here, too, she tried to persuade the Chevalier to wear his Greek decorations to Guizot's reception, but tried in vain, he considering such ornaments unfitting a republican. The autumn found them again in England, this time to learn the delights of country visiting. Their first visit was to Atherstone, the seat of Charles Nolte Bracebridge, a descendant of Lady Godiva, a most cultivated and delightful man. He and
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 6: South Boston 1844-1851; aet. 25-32 (search)
ve seen this many a day, or indeed ever.... The winter of 1849-50 was also spent at No. 74 Mount Vernon Street. Here, in February, 1850, a third daughter was born, and named Laura for Laura Bridgman. In the spring, our parents made a second voyage to Europe, taking with them the two youngest children, Julia Romana and Florence being left in the household of Dr. Edward Jarvis. They spent some weeks in England, renewing the friendships made seven years before; thence they journeyed to Paris, and from there to Boppart, where the Doctor took the water cure. Julia seems to have been too busy for letter-writing during this year; the Doctor writes to Charles Sumner of the beauty of Boppart, and adds: Julia and I have been enjoying walks upon the banks of the Rhine, and rambles upon the hillside, and musings among the ruins, and jaunts upon the waters as we have enjoyed nothing since we left home. He had but six months leave of absence; it was felt by both that Julia needed a lon
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Greece and other lands 1867; aet. 48 (search)
alled back to Athens at the moment of departure. The Journal tells of Verona, Innsbriick, Munich. Then came flying glimpses of Switzerland, with a few days' rest at Geneva, where she had the happiness of meeting her sister once more; finally, Paris and the Exposition of 1867. After a visit to Napoleon's tomb, she writes: Spent much of the afternoon in beginning a piece of tapestry after a Pompeiian pattern copied by me on the spot. Worsted work was an unfailing accompaniment of her jopecial talent for drawing, but took great pleasure in it, and was constantly making pencil sketches of persons and things that interested her. We even find patterns of Pompeiian mosaic or of historic needlework reproduced in the Journal. From Paris the travellers hurried to Belgium, and after a glance at Brussels, spent several days in Antwerp with great contentment. Both here and in Brussels she had been much interested in the beautiful lace displayed on every hand. She made several mode
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the peace crusade 1870-1872; aet. 51-53 (search)
the bitter humiliation suffered by them filled her with sorrow and indignation. In a lecture on Paris she says: The great Exposition of 1867 had drawn together an immense crowd from all parts of theely. Let them remember that French literature has done much to corrupt American women. Unhappy Paris has corrupted the world. She is now swept from the face of the earth. France was constantlys and determined to coerce us forcibly. In that weltering mass of ruin and corruption which was Paris, what lessons lie of the utter folly and futility of mutual murder! What hearts of brothers est She had been asked to attend two important meetings as American delegate: a peace congress in Paris, and a great prison reform meeting in London. The French meeting came first. She crossed the Channel, reaching Paris in time to attend the principal stance of the congress. She presented her credentials, asked leave to speak, and was told with some embarrassment that she might speak to the
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
ursting the tomb. October found the travellers in Paris, the elder still intent on affairs of study and refost conversation.... November 27. Packing to leave Paris to-night for Turin. The blanks left in my diary do of life. Yet I have had more good from my stay in Paris than this empty Journal would indicate. Have seen mwomen students, for which Deo gratias Farewell, dear Paris, God keep and save theel She mentions this club in the Reminiscences. I found in Paris a number of young women, students of art and medicine, who appeared Club.] I was invited several times to speak while in Paris.... I spoke in French without notes.... Before leaving Paris I was invited to take part in a congress of woman's rights. It was deemed proper to elect two preside and wore many decorations. During this visit to Paris, our mother consorted largely with the men and womennk and empty purse, which usually mark a return from Paris, will be a full heart and a hand clasping across the
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
ard to hold a World's Unitarian Congress at Chicago in September, 1893. I have accepted this. September 4. My last day at Sonnenberg. ... Gave my sister my little old Greek Lexicon, long a cherished companion. I had thought of reading the family one of my sermons, but my throat was troublesome and no one asked me to do anything of the kind. They wished to hear Pickwick, and a long reading was held in my room, the fire in the grate helping to cheer us. September 15. Left Montreux for Paris. Reed brought me a beautiful yellow rose, half-blown, upon which I needs must exercise my old trick of versification. Paper I had none — the back of a pasteboard box held one stanza, the cover of a Tauchnitz the others. September 18. Heard to-day of the noble poet, Whittier's death. What a great heart is gone with him! September 22. Liverpool. Embarked at about ten in the morning. Edward Atkinson, wife and daughter on board, a valuable addition to our resources. September 29. A