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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Life of George Ticknor. (search)
d noble nature. He had been a great deal about the world, and understood its ways. His manners were frank, open-hearted, and decisive, and, to some persons, brusque. All men respected, many loved him. Mrs. Perkins was the daughter of Mr. Stephen Higginson, Senior, —an important person at one time in the political affairs of the town of Boston, and the head of the commercial house of which Mr. Perkins was a member. Mrs. Perkins was at one time very beautiful. Talleyrand, when I was in Paris in 1818, spoke to me of her as the most beautiful young person he had ever known, he having seen her when in exile in this country. She was always striking in her person, and very brilliant in conversation. Her house was a most agreeable one, and I had become intimate and familiar there, dining with them generally every week. The journey to Hartford occupied two days then; and one of those days, there being no one in the coach with us, Mr. Perkins filled wholly with an account of the Re
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
that met the passengers as they entered the Mersey. May 11, 1815, evening. The pilot who is carrying us into Liverpool, told us of Bonaparte's return to Paris, and re-establishment at the head of the French Empire. We did not believe it; but from another pilot-boat, which we have just spoken, we have received an accountrte was in Elba, and all Europe in a state of profound peace. The pilot came on board as we approached the mouth of the Mersey, and told us that Bonaparte was in Paris, and that everything was preparing for a general war against him. Having been bred in the strictest school of Federalism, I felt as the great majority of the Engli; he has been in Downing Street this morning, and I have just seen him as he was going to Lady Wellington's. He says he thinks Bonaparte is in full retreat towards Paris. After an instant's pause, Lord Byron replied, I am d—d sorry for it; and then, after another slight pause, he added, I did n't know but I might live to see Lord
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
Hanover, to travel with him from Frankfort to Paris. This morning, therefore, we set out, and camas good as Caleb Williams. The booksellers of Paris, I believe, are not of his opinion, and probab but Benjamin Constant. To Elisha Ticknor. Paris, May 3, 1817. Well, my dear father and mothnow say I am settled down to my occupations in Paris; and, if I am not happy, which you will not bel, and at the Duchess de Broglie's the best in Paris. I have a general privilege at each of them; most so. One day Mr. Ticknor was walking in Paris with a friend and townsman, when they met Barothe office of the Prefecture of the Police for Paris, to find the records of the case; that none suth met at Benjamin Constant's. He has lived in Paris fifteen years, and is well known as a spy. M. Parker's, at Draveil, about twelve miles from Paris, a superb establishment, whose completeness sp Farewell, George. To Dr. Walter Channing. Paris, August 12, 1817. . . . . If you wish to ha[18 more...]
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
Chapter 7: Mr. Ticknor leaves Paris. visit to La Grange. Geneva. M. De La Rive. Pr Journal. September 2.—This morning I left Paris, and I have not left any city with so little r It is impossible to know General Lafayette in Paris and the world without feeling respect for his ich he possesses beyond any Frenchman I met in Paris, Mad. Rilliet a toutes les vertus qu'elle affbserved that the ladies were handsomer than at Paris, but not so graceful; and seemingly more genuimpt at brilliancy and epigram which I found in Paris society, and which I have found here only in Du M. de Pourceaugnac, which made much noise in Paris last winter, was performed by herself and halfnever forget. By the kindness of friends in Paris, and especially the family of Mad. de Stael, Itaste than the gayer and more witty circles in Paris, of which I had a complete surfeit. Almost the purpose, are collecting and collected from Paris, . . . . and from churches where they have sle[1 more...]
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
October. More of this hereafter. Geo. To Elisha Ticknor. January 15, 1818. . . . . Rome continues to be all to me that my imagination ever represented it, and all that it was when I first arrived here. This is saying a great deal after a residence of above two months; but in truth I find the resources of this wonderful city continually increasing upon me the longer I remain in it, and I am sure I shall leave it with more regret than I have yet left any spot in Europe. I went out of Paris without once recollecting that it was for the last time; but it will not be so with Rome. To Elisha Ticknor. Rome, February 1, 1818. . . . . Cogswell and myself have been presented to the Pope this morning. He is the only sovereign in Europe I have ever felt any curiosity to see, and I desired to see him very much, on account of the firmness and dignity with which he always behaved in the most difficult and distressing circumstances, when kings and governments, of force incomparably
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
emely pure; but the consequence is, that they have only eight or ten members; and yet the five volumes they have published, with their Chronicles, Partidas, Fuero Juzgo, etc., do them infinite credit, and show like the work of a great body of learned men. . . . . Even in the large cities and the capital it is astonishing to see how much they are behindhand,—how rude and imperfect is their house furniture, and how much is absolutely wanting. A great deal of the better sort is brought from Paris and London; and when an ambassador has kept a carriage two or three years, until it has become soiled and worn, he can sell it, as they all do, to some grandee, for more than it cost him. In the country it is, of course, worse. The chief persons in a village — I mean the respectable ecclesiastics and the alcaldes —often have no glass-ware in their houses, no dinner-knives, and little of earthen manufactory, while a metal fork is a matter of curiosity. In agriculture their instruments are <
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
jusqua au Roi, tout le monde dise, quand je passerai, c'est un excellent homme; il a le coeur profoundement bon; and, in truth, I never saw him otherwise. Mad. de Stael loved him very much, and during her last sickness, when he happened to be at Paris, used to beg him to come and see her every day, that she might enjoy his brilliant conversation; for, even at Paris, he was famous for this talent, and at Madrid was unique. His dinners were by far the pleasantest there, for whatever there was oParis, he was famous for this talent, and at Madrid was unique. His dinners were by far the pleasantest there, for whatever there was of elegant talent and literature at Madrid were friends at his house, and, wherever he was, the conversation took a more interesting and cultivated turn than elsewhere. The daily rides that I made with him, and Caesar de Balbo, are among the brightest spots in my life in Europe, though perhaps I never disputed so much and so hotly, in a given time, in my life, for though he is nearly fifty years old, and has passed, with unmoved tranquillity, through the revolutions of the last thirty years, wi
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 12: (search)
etc., and especially of an amphitheatre and some mosaics, of which La Borde has given a detailed and interesting description, with a history of the city down to its final fall in the sixth century, in a folio volume published some years since at Paris. Everything, however, is neglected. The amphitheatre even is falling in every year; the mosaics, as I absolutely saw, are a part of a sheepfold, and, of course, more and more broken up every day; and the only person, I believe, who takes any invale of Alcantara, just before it enters the city; and here it altogether exceeds everything I have seen, even the Pont du Gard, which is more remarkable than the aqueducts about Rome. The length of it here is more than two thousand four hundred Paris feet, and it passes on thirty-five enormous arches, springing from the depths of the valley and going boldly up to the top, of which the one in the centre is one hundred and seven feet eight inches wide and two hundred and thirty feet ten inches
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
m Lisbon to Falmouth. immediate departure for Paris. society. Talleyrand. return to London. LoEdinburgh. . . . . To Mr. Elisha Ticknor. Paris, December 22, 1818. Yours of the 16th—29th a, I should be at last obliged to come back to Paris, to find books and means neither Spain nor Poruted, that the better half is still wanting in Paris, where the rarest is to be found. Journal.his visits in other cities.—The dinner-hour at Paris is six o'clock or half past 6. I always dined a plate. Dinner is not so solemn an affair at Paris as it is almost everywhere else. It is soon oost frequently, and the persons I best knew at Paris, excepting my countrymen. . . . . Humboldt, I Among the smaller souvenirs of this visit in Paris are notes from the Duc de Broglie and from Hum Prince Talleyrand, whom I saw occasionally in Paris this winter (1818-19), and of whom I have giverate, he suffered Burr to fall into poverty in Paris and come home a beggar, arriving at Boston, wh[7 more...]<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
ing of Sismondi, who had, a few days earlier, married a sister of Lady Mackintosh, Miss Allen, a cultivated lady, who, with her two sisters, I had seen often at Rome, and whom I felt that I already knew pretty well. Sismondi, too, I had known at Paris, in the society of the De Broglies and De Staels, during the preceding winter. To these were added Lord John Russell, and Malthus, who is attached to the same college with Sir James. It was, therefore, a party well calculated to call out each oe is more a politician than anything else. . . . . I This anecdote was written out later by Mr. Ticknor, and added to the Journal. had much known in Madrid Sir Henry Wellesley, ambassador there, and afterwards, as Lord Cowley, ambassador at Paris. He gave me important letters of introduction, and wrote besides to London, desiring me to be presented to his venerable mother. One morning, therefore, the Dowager Marchioness of Downshire took me, with her two charming, cultivated daughters,
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