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James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Dante. (search)
ring the Middle Ages, Tartar was only a cryptonym by which heretics knew each other, and adds: Il n'y a done pas trop à s'etonner des noms bizarres de Mastino et de Cane donnes d ces Della Scala. (Dante, heretique, revolutionnaire, et socialiste, Paris, 1854, pp. 118-120.) of Verona, or the length of his stay with him, may have been, it is certain that he was in Ravenna in 1320, and that, on his return thither from an embassy to Venice (concerning which a curious letter, forged probably by Donieatrice, since 'tis a work of Faith.—Purgatorio, XVIII. 46-48. Beatrice here evidently impersonates Theology. It would be interesting to know what was the precise date of Dante's theological studies. The earlier commentators all make him go to Paris, the great fountain of such learning, after his banishment. Boccaccio indeed says that he did not return to Italy till 1311. Wegele (Dante's Leben und Werke, p. 85) puts the date of his journey between 1292 and 1297. Ozanam, with a pathos comi
James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Wordsworth. (search)
degree of B. A., and left Cambridge. During the summer of this year he visited Wales, and, after declining to enter upon holy orders under the plea that he was not of age for ordination, went over to France in November, and remained during the winter at Orleans. Here he became intimate with the republican General Beaupuis, with whose hopes and aspirations he ardently sympathized. In the spring of 1792 he was at Blois, and returned thence to Orleans, which he finally quitted in October for Paris. He remained here as long as he could with safety, and at the close of the year went back to England, thus, perhaps, escaping the fate which soon after overtook his friends the Brissotins. As hitherto the life of Wordsworth may be called a fortunate one, not less so in the training and expansion of his faculties was this period of his stay in France. Born and reared in a country where the homely and familiar nestles confidingly amid the most savage and sublime forms of nature, he had ex