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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 88 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 42 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 32 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 20 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 16 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 10 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Saxony (Saxony, Germany) or search for Saxony (Saxony, Germany) in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
e Minister of Police came out of the cabinet, and one who, I understood afterwards, had formerly been Minister of Finance to the King of Sardinia, was admitted. His business did not occupy the Premier many minutes. A Hungarian Count, dressed in a full suit of really splendid uniform as a Hussar officer, next passed in, carrying in his hand a huge letter with broad black edges, containing, as I learnt, a reply to the letter of condolence which this officer had carried to the present King of Saxony on the death of the late King, King Anton had died June 6.. . . . and when this was over the Prince came out into the antechamber to me. Meanwhile, however, Von Hammer had joined me there, and said he wanted to speak to the Premier. I told him I was only going in to see the library, and he said he would go in with me. When, therefore, the Prince came out, we both went towards the door to meet him. But it was plain, in an instant, that he did not mean to have a visit from Mr. Von Hamm
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
were all meant for me. November 14.—I brought a letter from Prince John, of Saxony, to the Grand Duke, . . . . in consequence of which I received yesterday, from . The subjects were chosen chiefly by himself, but after talking a little about Saxony, and the princes there, and a little more about Florence and the objects of my rt disappeared, and we were at home before one o'clock. Prince Maximilian of Saxony-one of whose daughters is now Duchess Dowager of Tuscany, and another was the felia's parlor, where she was waiting for us. There we sat down and talked about Saxony, which seemed to please the old Prince very much. . . . He talked well and kindon account of the dangerous illness of one of the family. She is a Princess of Saxony, own cousin to the unfortunate Louis XVI., and married to the head of that ancithe Austrian Ambassador's, blazing with diamonds such as I have not seen out of Saxony, and little looking as if she had been begging all day, and receiving sums, as
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 4: (search)
unwelcome to a government as weak and as anxious as this. About a year ago they received a very remote, gentle, and indirect hint, as mild as priestly skill could make it, that it was feared the tendency of such meetings was not good. The hint was taken, and the meetings have since been discontinued. Yet Count Ludolf is a legitimist of unquestionable fidelity, and the whole party as far as possible from anything political. I could not help contrasting such a state of things with that in Saxony . . . . On my way to the Capitol this forenoon, walking with Colonel Mure, Colonel William Mure, of Caldwell, author of Critical History of the Language and Literature of Ancient Greece. I went to see a house not far from the foot of the hill, which Bunsen pointed out to us, lately, as an ancient Roman house. Certainly the walls looked as if they were of ancient materials and workmanship, and certainly the whole seemed as uncomfortable as we have ever supposed the Romans lived; but so
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
ximilian and the Princess Amelia. . . . . They are now in villeggiatura at Castello, a small villa of the Grand Duke, three or four miles from the city. The drive to it was beautiful, . . . . and everything is now in the freshness and luxuriance of spring . . . . . They received us with kindness and empressement, and talked upon subjects which they knew would be agreeable to us. I was struck, however, with their air and manner when they spoke of the present meeting of the Diet or Estates in Saxony, which is an innovation brought in by the Constitution of 1831. Their countenances fell at once, and their tone was as of something unpleasant; for though the Diet has never done anything that could annoy the reigning family, and though Prince Max, and especially his daughter, are persons of truly good sense, the instincts of aristocracy could not be quite suppressed. There is not a drop of its blood in Europe that does not tingle at the name of a representative government. The Grand Duk
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
Arrival at home. letters to Miss Edgeworth, Mr. Legare, Prince John of Saxony, Count Circourt, Mr. Prescott, Mr. Kenyon, and others. death of Mr. Legare. ble fate of the old Greek tragedians. . . . To H. R. H. Prince John, Duke of Saxony. Boston, U. S. A., May 17, 1839. my dear Lord,—I received in the summer of d its power to maintain the cause of the Union increased. To Prince John, of Saxony. Boston, U. S. A., March 15, 1842. my Lord,—I received duly your very kind y faithfully and affectionately yours, George Ticknor. From Prince John, of Saxony. Dresden, 4 July, 1842. dear Sir, Prince John always wrote to Mr. Ticknoof Hamburgh has made a great sensation in the whole of Germany. Our affairs in Saxony, particularly, go on well. Trade and industry are flourishing, and agriculturef the highest consideration, with which I am Your affectionate John, Duke of Saxony To Rev. H. H. Milman, London. Boston, U. S. A., May 7, 1842. my dear Sir
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
on, G. T. Curtis, C. S. Daveis, Prince John of Saxony, G. S. Hillard, and Horatio Greenough. summitten after his return home, to Prince John of Saxony, he mentions a visit to the prison at Auburn, our loving father, G. T. To Prince John, of Saxony. Boston, U. S. A., October 30, 1846. my deWhenever I have an opportunity I inquire about Saxony and its affairs, and am always glad when I hea convulsions of 1789. From Prince John, of Saxony. Pillnitz, the 14 May, 1848. dear Sir,—I hfriendship, Your affectionate John, Duke of Saxony. My compliments to Mrs. Ticknor. To Mirculating them. . . . . To Prince John, of Saxony. Boston, U. S. A., July 30, 1848. My dear ant, George Ticknor. From Prince John, of Saxony. Pillnitz, 3 September, 1848. dear Sir,—I y respects, a false way. . . . . With us in Saxony, things are relatively better, and have even mn begin. Your sincere friend, John, Duke of Saxony. To Charles S. Daveis. Manchester, Septemb
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
thout a moment's chance for preparation, Mr. Ticknor responded with what a person present asserts was one of the happiest and most effective little speeches he had ever heard. This was the only time Mr. Ticknor was ever entrapped into such a performance; a fact as significant of his tastes, as the testimony to his success is significant of his gifts. . . . . Hoping that when your leisure permits we may hear from you again, Very sincerely yours, Geo. Ticknor To Prince John, Duke of Saxony, Dresden. Boston, July 22, 1850. my dear Prince,—I have desired to write to you for some time, and acknowledge the receipt of a very interesting and instructive letter which you sent me in the spring, and a note of May 9, in which you speak with your accustomed kindness of my History of Spanish Literature, of which I had early ventured to send you a copy. But the state of our public affairs, on which I wished to say something, seemed every week to be likely to take a decisive turn . . .
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
Chapter 14: Letters. death of Mr. Webster. Crimean War. letters to C. S. Daveis, E. Everett, Sir E. Head, King John of Saxony, Sir C. Lyell. To C. S. Daveis, Portland. Boston, October 30, 1852. My dear Charles,—I received your letter, in your old familiar hand,—always welcome to my eyes,—when I returnedtters came from the Lyells, last steamer, and all accounts announce the entire success of Prescott's book. Yours faithfully, Geo. Ticknor. To King John, of Saxony. this Prince had come to the throne, on the death of his brother, in August, 1854. Boston, November 20, 1855. Sire,—I received duly your Majesty's last letempted to introduce it. I hope I shall soon hear again from your Majesty, and that you will give me, not only good accounts of yourself and your family, but of Saxony and Dresden, to which we are all much attached, and of the prospects of an European peace. . . . . I remain very faithfully, your Majesty's friend and servant
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
ck. Once, as we were going along a walk where a cord had been stretched, to signify that the passage was forbidden, he removed it and told us to go through. I hesitated, and objected on account of the prohibition. I should like, he replied, to see anybody, in Potsdam or Berlin, who will stop me when I have these crooked lines that everybody knows—taking out Humboldt's note—telling me to go on. Just so it was when I dined with the King, in consequence of a letter to him from the King of Saxony. It was a large dinner in honor of the arrival of the Duke of Baden, who was married three days afterwards to the beautiful and only niece of the King. Humboldt, as you know, dines with the King every day, and sits in the strangers place of honor, opposite to him at a narrow table. He had me introduced by the proper person to all the family, and introduced me, himself, to everybody else that I could possibly desire to know, and more than I can now remember; intimated—I have no doubt—to
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 24: (search)
1867 to 1870. letters to Sir E. Head, Hon. E. Twisleton, Sir Walter Trevelyan, the King of Saxony, G. T. Curtis, General Thayer. To Sir Edmund Head, London. Boston, February 21, 1867. laimed, and apparently won, the place. Is he obliged to reside? To his Majesty John, King of Saxony. Boston, U. S. A., September 6, 1867. Sire,—The political condition of the world, on both si-day. Look out, therefore, for tomorrow. Yours from 1804-5, Geo. Ticknor. To the King of Saxony. Boston, U. S. A., September 29, 1870. Sire,—Your Majesty is called to great private sufferiome true, more, probably, false. Still, whatever we hear, be assured that we are interested for Saxony, that we always desire your welfare, your success, your honor, and that we can never cease to synd affectionately, Your friend and servant, George Ticknor. From his Majesty, the King of Saxony. Wesenstein, the 17 October, 1870. dear Sir,—I have received, some days ago, your letter of <
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