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Strabo, Geography 38 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 30 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 14 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Cyclops (ed. David Kovacs) 10 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Aetna (Italy) or search for Aetna (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
rom haima (blood); hence “the Bloody Mountain.” It is said that a city of Egypt received the same name for the same reason (Stephanus Byzantius, s.v. h(rw/). And when he started to flee through the Sicilian sea, Zeus cast Mount Etna in Sicily upon him. That is a huge mountain, from which down to this day they say that blasts of fire issue from the thunderbolts that were thrown.As to Typhon under Mount Etna see Aesch. PB 363ff.; Pind. P. 1.17(32)ff; Oviof Egypt received the same name for the same reason (Stephanus Byzantius, s.v. h(rw/). And when he started to flee through the Sicilian sea, Zeus cast Mount Etna in Sicily upon him. That is a huge mountain, from which down to this day they say that blasts of fire issue from the thunderbolts that were thrown.As to Typhon under Mount Etna see Aesch. PB 363ff.; Pind. P. 1.17(32)ff; Ovid, Fasti iv.491ff.; Ov. Met. 5.352ff. So much for that
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
poisoned tunic took fire and burned Herakles. That it was thought to be kindled by exposure to the heat of the sun appears from the narrative of Hyginus, Fab. 36; compare Soph. Trach. 684-704; Seneca, Herakles Oetaeus 485ff., 716ff. The waters of Thermopylae are steaming hot to this day. See Adonis, Attis, Osiris, 3rd ed. i.210ff. The Vatican Mythographers, perhaps through the blunder of a copyist, transfer the death of Herakles from Mount Oeta to Mount Etna. mounted it, and gave orders to kindle it. When no one would do so, Poeas, passing by to look for his flocks, set a light to it. On him Hercules bestowed his bow. While the pyre was burning, it is said that a cloud passed under Hercules and with a peal of thunder wafted him up to heaven.The ascension of Herakles to heaven in a cloud is described also by Zenobius, Cent. i.33, who copies Apollodorus. In a more sceptical vein Diod. 4.38.4 relates that, as