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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Du Pont's attack at Charleston. (search)
retained at Newport News to watch the iron-clad Richmond. The Richmond was built in 1862 with means raised by subscription, and was the first fully armored ship put afloat on James River by the Confederates. She remained in the James River Squadron to the end of the war.--editors. No others are likely to be finished and sent to sea within the next six weeks. A large number of our best wooden vessels, necessary for the blockade, but not for the attack, are unfortunately required in the West Indies to pursue the Florida and Alabama. This withdrawal of blockading vessels renders the capture of Charleston and Mobile imperative, and the department will share the responsibility imposed upon the commanders who make the attempt. Inclosed is a copy of a memorandum furnished by the Secretary of War. Very respectfully, Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Dear-Admiral S. F. Du Pont, commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Port Royal, S. C. It was impossible for an admiral t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The boat attack on Sumter. (search)
he extent of our loss. We found this amounted to 124 killed, wounded, and missing, out of 400 men. Among the killed was Lieutenant C. H. Bradford of the Marines. Lieutenant E. P. Williams, Executive of the Powhatan, a brave and dashing officer, and Lieutenants B. H. Porter and S. W. Preston were taken prisoners. They were all exchanged, and Porter and Preston were killed in the second attack on Fort Fisher. Preston, Porter, and Forrest — the last of whom died of yellow fever in the West Indies--were close friends, and alike in those qualities that adorn humanity and make heroes of men. Lieutenant F. W. Bunce and Dr. Wheeler, both of the Patapsco, in this affair sustained the high reputation they had already earned on every occasion when the Patapsco had been engaged on perilous service. Conspicuous, also, were the services of Daniel Leech, Acting Paymaster of the Patapsco, who at the same time performed the duties of signal officer. There was material in the command, both in