Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for West Indies or search for West Indies in all documents.

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ct is, the future holds out little encouragement. Every week the stock of cotton — for the manufacture of that article is the staple produce of England — becomes small by degrees and beautifully less, and the question arises where shall we look for a fresh supply when the present one is exhausted? The East Indies may send us 300,000 or 400,000 extra bales; but this is a mere sop to Cerberus, when measured by our actual necessities. What supplies may we hope for from Australia, from the West Indies, from the West Coast of Africa, or the other portions of the earth to which we were told to direct our eyes? Ultimately, we may perhaps receive from these and other sources enough to keep the mills of Lancashire and Lanarkshire going; but while the grass grows the seed starves, and the difficulty is how to manage during the painful interval. This difficulty must have been present to the minds of the Southern planters when they raised the standard of revolt. They argued that the first l
and better understanding may lead to the repeal of all these offensive statutes. So far from strengthening the institution of slavery by secession, we shall weaken, if not destroy it. If the war which disunion is to bring with it shall continue for a few years, England and France, cut off from their supplies of American cotton, will seek them from other sources; and as it is well ascertained that cotton can be grown to any extent in India, Australia, South America, Central America, the West Indies, and other parts of the globe, the new sources of supply will be found. India already furnishes to England, per annum, 600,000 bales. And the high prices which the article will command during the continuance of the war, and the opening of railroads to transport it to the sea, will so stimulate the production that, before the lapse of many years, England and France will not be dependent on the Southern States for their supplies and the Southern cotton monopoly being thus gone, what will s
nd scientific contributions, served it faithfully in varied spheres, and promised much for it in future. The squadron in the Pacific, under the command of Flag-Officer John B. Montgomery, consists of 6 vessels, 82 guns, and 1,000 men. The West India squadron is under the command of Flag-Officer G. J. Pendergrast, who has been temporarily on duty, with his flag-ship, the Cumberland, at Norfolk and Hampton Roads, since the 23d of March. He will, at an early day, transfer his flag to the steam-frigate Roanoke, and proceed southward, having in charge our interests on the Mexican and Central American coasts, and in the West India Islands. The East India, Mediterranean, Brazil, and African squadrons, excepting one vessel of each of the two latter, have been recalled. The return of these vessels will add to the force for service in the Gulf and on the Atlantic coast about 200 guns and 2,500 men. resignation and dismissal of officers. Since the 4th of March two hundred and