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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
s displayed the knowledge of the artist and the gastronomer. He criticised the ornaments of the drawing-room and the dining-room like a connoisseur, and discussed subtle points of cookery with the same earnestness with which he emancipated the West India slaves and abolished rotten boroughs. Calling for a second plate of soup, he said that there was a thought too much of the flavor of wine; but that it was very good. He told how he secured good steaks, by personally going into the kitchen andd in his life; and his life covered the period of Pitt and Fox. In this judgment Lord W. concurred. Mr. Rogers has told me that Sir Robert Peel said he never knew what eloquence was till he heard B.'s speech on the abolition of slavery in the West Indies. Do not listen to the articles and the reports that Lord B. is no speaker. He is most eloquent; and his voice, as I heard it in the Lords six months ago, still rings in my ear. And yet I cannot pardon his gross want of propriety in conversa
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
ent of wines incontrovertible. With him a dinner is the putting in practice of a great science. I need not add, that the host and intimate friend of such a guest gave us a simple but choice dinner. My wonder at Brougham rises anew. To-night he has displayed the knowledge of the artist and the gastronomer. He criticised the ornaments of the drawing-room and the dining-room like a connoisseur, and discussed subtle points of cookery with the same earnestness with which he emancipated the West India slaves and abolished rotten boroughs. Calling for a second plate of soup, he said that there was a thought too much of the flavor of wine; but that it was very good. He told how he secured good steaks, by personally going into the kitchen and watching over his cook, to see that he did not spoil them by pepper and horse-radish,—the last being enough to make a man go mad. I called his attention to the woodcock story, of which I have already written you, and he told me that the epigram whic
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 27, 1839. (search)
ful man; and, I am disposed to believe, the most eloquent one in English history. I think I have already told you that Earl Grey said to Lord Wharncliffe, on the evening of B.'s speech on the Reform Bill, that it was the greatest speech he ever heard in his life; and his life covered the period of Pitt and Fox. In this judgment Lord W. concurred. Mr. Rogers has told me that Sir Robert Peel said he never knew what eloquence was till he heard B.'s speech on the abolition of slavery in the West Indies. Do not listen to the articles and the reports that Lord B. is no speaker. He is most eloquent; and his voice, as I heard it in the Lords six months ago, still rings in my ear. And yet I cannot pardon his gross want of propriety in conversation. Think of the language I heard him use about O'Connell. He called him a damned thief. You will also read the article on Prescott in the Edinburgh. It is written by somebody who understands the subject, and who praises with great discrimina
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
South. To his brother Henry he wrote, April 14, 1842:— We have just heard that you are bound for Havana; perhaps at this moment you are frying under the West India sun. We are all well, as we have been for months. You know Mary has not been strong. She has been obliged to abandon her studies; but I think she has been gaih, however agreeable to the South, will hardly satisfy Lord Palmerston. I understand that Lord Ashburton engages, for his government, that the local law of the West Indies shall not in future be applied to American slaves in certain cases. Lord Ashburton engaged that instructions should be given against officious interference wo fasten a rider upon the ratification, of this sort: Considering the engagement by Lord Ashburton on behalf of his Government not to apply the local law of the West Indies, &c., we hereby ratify, &c. Wise counsels prevailed; and their treaty escaped this defacement. Loving peace as I do, and hating slavery as I do, I feel embarr