Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Barbados (Barbados) or search for Barbados (Barbados) in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
ecy at a Liverpool shipyard in the fall and winter of 1861-62. By the middle of March, 1862, the vessel was ready for sea. Before this, however, the new steamship had fallen under the suspicion of the American minister, who pressed the British Government to detain her, but so well had the secret of her ultimate use been kept that nothing definite could be learned. The Florida had much ill-luck at first, and spent several months in the harbor of Mobile. Late in February, 1863, she left Barbadoes for a cruise which proved to be one of the most brilliant in the history of the Confederate navy. From the latitude of New York city to that of Bahia, Brazil, this gallant vessel roamed the Western Atlantic. In May, the big Clarence was taken off the Brazilian coast, and Lieutenant Charles W. Read, a most daring officer, was put on board with a crew. Read started north and within a month had captured five vessels. Four of these were burned, and to the fifth, the schooner Tacony, Read t