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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 58 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 42 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 34 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 22 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Bermuda or search for Bermuda in all documents.

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n our own, I beg leave to call your attention to the following extracts from private letters recently found on the prize steamer Ceres, which plainly show that all such statements are fictions: Captain Maffit, in a letter to Mr. Lamar, dated Liverpool, October, says: The news from blockade-runners is decidedly bad. Six of the last boats have recently been caught, among them the Advance and Eugenie. Nothing has entered Wilmington for the last month. The firm of William P. Campbell, of Bermuda, says, in a letter to their correspondents in Charleston, dated December second, 1863: It is very dull here. The only boats that came in from Wilmington this moon were the Flora and Gibraltar. Captain Ridgely, senior naval officer off Wilmington, reports, under date of the tenth instant, that but one vessel has succeeded in getting in, to the knowledge of any of the blockading vessels, and that on the night of the tenth instant. She was fired at and hit several times by the Howqua and
ne man, shot under the fire from the enemy's sharp-shooters occupying riflepits on the sand-hills, which were high and near, and got her log-book, from which it appears that she is the Ranger; that she left Newcastle November eleventh, 1863, for Bermuda, where, after touching at Teneriffe, she arrived on the eighth of December; that she sailed from Bermuda January sixth, 1864, made our coast January tenth, about five miles north-east of Murrill's inlet, and landed her passengers. The next mornBermuda January sixth, 1864, made our coast January tenth, about five miles north-east of Murrill's inlet, and landed her passengers. The next morning at daylight, intercepted by this ship, the Daylight, Governor Buckingham, and Aries, in her approach to Western bar, she was beached and fired by her crew as above mentioned. The attempts of the Governor Buckingham, aided by the Daylight and Aries, to extinguish the fire and haul the ranger off, were frustrated by the enemy's sharp-shooters, whose fire completety commanded her decks. This ship, drawing about twenty-four (24) feet, was taken in four and one half (4 1/2) fathoms of water in