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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Slavery. (search)
pany should resolve upon the cultivation of tropical products in India, and carry it to the extent to which they would be capable of carrying it, it is all over with American slavery. Gentlemen, I have mentioned these circumstances, not with a view of dictating to you any particular plan of operations, but only to show you the possibility of having your great object accomplished, and this to its fullest extent; for what I have said relatively to the United States is equally applicable to Cuba, Brazil, and other parts of the South American continent,--and besides, the East India Company have twenty times more land than is sufficient to enable them to compete with them all. The proprietors and conductors of the American newspapers, to which Mr. Clarkson refers, are the agents of the banks, and the agents of the slave-holders. It is not their policy to endeavor to raise and secure a high price in the market of Liverpool, for fear the eyes of Great Britain should be turned to her
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Welcome to George Thompson (1840). (search)
weight of American bondage. [Cheers.] It is said that the earthquake of Lisbon tossed the sea in billows on the coast of Cuba; so no indignant heart is beating anywhere whose pulses are not felt on the walls of our American Bastile. [Cheers.] Whensaid in his speech at Faneuil Hall, If the philanthropist wishes to say anything about slavery, let him strike his blow in Cuba, let him strike it below the line, let him go where the stars and stripes do not wave over it. Is there not a story of onre be such a story, is not the advice of the eloquent gentleman flat plagiarism? Besides, George Thompson has come to his Cuba, come where his stars and stripes [The Union Jack] do not wave, and yet the Choates of the island do not seem to agree witrtunates reach Charleston or New Orleans,--and, by the way, what bond is taken that they ever shall, and not be carried to Cuba or Brazil first?--they, the mistakenly kidnapped citizens of the Commonwealth, shall have all the blessed privileges of a