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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
untry, or what the whole people—little likely to be deceived on such great matters affecting themselves—believe to be their real interests . . . . The affair of Cuba, I suppose, made much noise for a time in Germany, and perhaps the American government was blamed. But it did not deserve to be. We have, as you know, no secret phagres,—as if they were going to California,—in a regular packet from New Orleans, and then, when at sea, were transferred to the steam-vessel that carried them to Cuba. The government officers and the agents of the Spanish Minister at Washington, who suspected what was going on, had been watching for some time at New Orleans, Neeen arrested, and will be tried. It was a piratical affair altogether. The persons engaged in it were chiefly foreigners, and the money to carry it on came from Cuba. The death of Sir Robert Peel will be felt in the affairs of Europe; in England his great administrative talents will be excessively missed . . . . I have finish
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
t is, in my humble judgment, as certain as anything future can be. Nor will one square mile belonging now to the territory of the United States be cursed with slavery, which is not at this present moment cursed with it. Of course I do not speak of Cuba or Mexico. I only pray that they may never be added to our Confederacy. Nor will they, except with the consent of Europe. To Sir Edmund Head. Boston, June 21, 1858. I hope the second edition of Shall and Will An admirable treatise by Sf the R——s. They were all out of my beat by twenty miles. I suppose he represents the opinion of England when he shows less disposition than has been usual with your ministers, to fall in with our Northern notions about slavery, and to insist that Cuba shall not be annexed to the United States. Probably it would do no harm to England to have us possess all the West Indies and all South America; but I do not conceive it to be for our interest to have more territory, North or South. It is now ne