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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 30: Averill's raid and the winter campaign. (search)
oaming, it had swelled to two or three thousand men. Those things will happen sometimes to the bravest of men. We were again able to send General Lee's army about a thousand beef cattle, and some few other supplies, which served to keep up the spirits of our much enduring men. The weather we had had for this expedition was unusually mild and favorable for that season when, in the section into which we went, the climate is usually as harsh among the mountains as it is in that part of Canada bordering on the Lakes. Shortly after our return, the troops were moved further up the valley, the two infantry brigades going into camp near Harrisonburg, and the cavalry going to Rockbridge and the railroad west of Staunton where forage could be obtained, a small force being left to picket down the valley. Major Gilmor subsequently made a raid down the valley, and captured a train on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. After the troops had been located, in company with Captain Hotch
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Appendix: the testimony of letters. (search)
spirations. I do not believe that I shall become a Bonaparte or a Bolivar, but he who never aspires, never rises. I have confined this letter to one subject because my whole soul is taken up with that subject. General Early returned from Canada to the States in 1869; that winter was devoted to visits among his relatives and friends from whom he had been so long parted. His father died in 1870. In the autobiography he writes of his father as still living: it is therefore presumable that his manuscript was, at least, commenced while he was in Canada. Previously he had published at Toronto (in 1866), A Memoir of the Last Year of the War for Independence, which was written, he states, under a solemn sense of duty to my unhappy country, and to the brave soldiers who fought under me, as well as to myself. His correspondence was very large and in many cases continued during years. Through this runs the story of his unflagging interest and industry in endeavoring to confirm
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
11, 413, 419, 420 Burke's Station, 50 Burnside, General (U. S. A.), 104, 1.05, 106, 131, 132, 150, 151, 158, 165, 166, 169, 180, 189, 192, 341, 343, 348, 356, 358, 477 Burton's Mill, 242 Butler, General (U. S. A.), 40, 341, 344, 364 Butterfield (U. S. A.), 218 Cabell, General, 198, 210 Calf Pasture River, 326 Callahan's, 327, 330 Callaway, Lieutenant, Wm. G., 187, 209, 250, 464 Camden, 184 Cameron's Depot, 408 Campbell Court-House, 376 Camp Walker, 6, 12 Canada, 472 Capital, 90, 159, 160 Carlisle, 255, 263 Caroline, 184 Carpenter, 206 Carrington, 176, 179 Carter, Colonel, 445 Carter House, 26, 27 Carter, Lieutenant T. H., 422, 460 Cash, Colonel, 27, 28 Cashtown, 256, 257, 264, 266, 267, 276, 278, 279 Castleman's Ferry, 164, 396 Catharpin Creek, 237 Catlett's Station, 110, 114 Catoctan Mountain, 386 Cavetown, 254 Cedar Creek, 242, 368, 369, 398, 406, 407, 417, 418, 430, 437, 438, 439, 440, 441, 442, 44