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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
s were out of the collection of an old archbishop of the Valencia family, of the house of Cordova. When I had finished this, . . . . I went to see Prince Metternich. I brought a letter to him from Baron Humboldt; but when I arrived he was in Hungary, from whence he returned yesterday. This morning I received a note from him, saying he would be glad to see me at the Chancery between two and three o'clock. I went, and found it an enormous building, or rather pile of buildings, containing nota fortnight ago she lost her youngest child, about three months old; but so much is her salon a part of the government that she was obliged, only four nights afterwards, to be in her place to receive company. The Prince took her to an estate in Hungary last week, to revive her a little; but here they are again, both of them chained to their oars. June 28.—I made a visit to Mr. Von Hammer in his town-house this morning, where I saw his curious and valuable library of Oriental manuscripts, wh
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
ish history which he has chiefly examined thus far. . . . . I shall be very curious to see the continuation of his work, for this first volume —1849—comes down only through the Chronicle and old poems on the Cid, concerning which his discussions are very acute, if not always satisfactory. You keep the run of our politics from the Advertiser, . . . . and in that case you have not missed reading Webster's letter to Hulsemann, the Austrian Charge, on the subject of the agent we sent towards Hungary, during their troubles. I refer to it, therefore, only to say that it is satisfactory to the whole of this country, without distinction of party. . . . . I had a letter from Stirling last steamer. He has been in Russia, and talks of coming here at some indefinite time. Lord Carlisle's lecture about America is very flattering to some of us, and for one I feel grateful to him for his notice of me, but I think its tone is not statesmanlike. . . . . However, it seems to have given general