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Polybius, Histories 150 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 98 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 36 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 32 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 30 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 26 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 26 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 20 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 20 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Politics. You can also browse the collection for Macedonia (Macedonia) or search for Macedonia (Macedonia) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Politics, Book 6, section 1319a (search)
ue to OxylusLeader of the Heraclidae in their invasion of the Peloponnese, and afterwards king of Elis. with some similar provision, forbidding loans secured on a certain portion of a man's existing estate), but at the present day it would also be well to introduce reform by means of the law of the Aphytaeans, as it is serviceable for the purpose of which we are speaking; the citizens of AphytisAphytis was on the Isthmus of Pallene in Macedonia. although numerous and possessing a small territory nevertheless are all engaged in agriculture, for they are assessed not on the whole of their estates, but on divisions of them so small that even the poor can exceed the required minimum in their assessments.No satisfactory explanation seems to have been suggested of what this means. After the agricultural communitythe best kind of democracy is where the people are herdsmen and get their living fro
Aristotle, Politics, Book 7, section 1324b (search)
o among all the non-Hellenic nations that are strong enough to expand at the expense of others, military strength has been held in honor, for example, among the Scythians, Persians, Thracians and Celts. Indeed among some peoples there are even certain laws stimulating military valor; for instance at Carthage, we are told, warriors receive the decoration of armlets of the same number as the campaigns on which they have served; and at one time there was also a law in Macedonia that a man who had never killed an enemy must wear his halter instead of a belt. Among Scythian tribes at a certain festival a cup was carried round from which a man that had not killed an enemy was not allowed to drink. Among the Iberians, a warlike race, they fix small spitsOr perhaps ‘pointed stones.’in the earth round a man's grave corresponding in number to the enemies he has killed. So with other races there are many other practices of a similar kind, s