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Polybius, Histories 150 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 98 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 36 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 32 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 30 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 26 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 26 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 20 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 20 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). You can also browse the collection for Macedonia (Macedonia) or search for Macedonia (Macedonia) in all documents.

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T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act prologue, scene 0 (search)
as a city of Calabria, in the south of Italy. It was said to have been founded by the Lacedaemonians.; the other one he left with his mother at home. By accident, there were games at Tarentum when he came there: many persons, as generally happens at the games, had met together; the child strayed away there from his father among the people. A certain merchant of Epidamnus was there; he picked up the child, and carried it away to EpidamnusTo Epidamnus: Epidamnus, or Epidamnum, was a town of Macedonia, situate on the Adriatic Sea. It was much resorted to for the purpose of transit to the opposite shores of Italy. It received its original name from Epidamnus, one of its kings but on falling into the possession of the Romans, they changed its name, as we are informed by Pliny the Elder, into Dyrrachium, from a superstitious notion that when hey were going to "Epidamnum," they were going "to their loss," as "damnum" is the Latin for "loss" or "destruction," and e)pi/ is the Greek prepositi