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sbanded, father, and the men have gone home; and I thought I would come to see you, and then go back. Has General Johnston come home? No, sir. Then go back; you cannot come in here! The son hurried back to the beach, got aboard a schooner, and was with the army in time to share with his comrades under Shivers in the attack on Monterey. The following letter, written soon after the battle of Monterey, gives a sufficient view of the campaign, terminating in that fine feat of arms: Monterey, Mexico, September 28, 1846. my dear son: My regiment was disbanded at Camargo on the 24th of August, under the construction of the law given by the War Department in reference to six months volunteers. Soon after, General Taylor offered me the appointment of inspector-general of the field division of volunteers under Major-General Butler, which I accepted, as I was desirous of participating in the campaign which was about to commence. The army moved from Camargo, and was concentrated at C
standing everything opposing, have added the greatest lustre to our arms. The following testimonial to the great abilities and solid character of the hero of Monterey and Buena Vista is inserted as one soldier's estimate of another, whom he had known under trying and widely varying circumstances: August 3, 1847. Dear Prestsays: The life of seclusion and obscurity in which I have lived accounts for your not having heard from me. On my return from Mexico after the campaign of Monterey, I found that all the proceeds of the Louisville property would scarcely suffice for the education of Will and his sister, and that it was necessary to go to worost obtuse felt that without some new and more popular name the fate of the Whig party was sealed; and presently attention was turned to the victor of Resaca and Monterey. General Taylor promptly and bluntly put aside the glittering temptation; but the over-astute policy of the Government in its further employment of him gave col