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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 230 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 104 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 82 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 74 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 46 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 46 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Colorado (Colorado, United States) or search for Colorado (Colorado, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 5: capture of the works at Hatteras Inlet by Flag officer Stringham.--destruction of the privateer Judah. (search)
achievement for a squadron mounting 158 guns, yet the work was well done, and little damage was received from the enemy. As soon as the white flag was shown from Fort Hatteras, some of the light draft vessels entered the inlet and drove off the reinforcements that were evidently endeavoring to reach the forts. At 2:30 P. M. General Butler went on board Com. Stringham's flagship, taking with him Flag Officer Samuel Barron, C. S. N., commanding naval defences of Virginia and N. Carolina, Col. Martin, 7th Reg., N. C. Infantry, and Col. Andrews, commanding Forts Hatteras and Clark, who had surrendered unconditionally with their commands. Soon after the Commodore proceeded in the Minnesota to New York, where all the prisoners were transferred to Governor's Island. This was our first naval victory, indeed our first victory of any kind, and should not be forgotten. The Union cause was then in a depressed condition, owing to the reverses it had experienced. The moral effect of t