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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 230 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 104 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 82 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 74 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 46 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 46 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Colorado (Colorado, United States) or search for Colorado (Colorado, United States) in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
Colonel Craig I believe to be wholly unauthorized by the war department. It was injudicious and impolitic, added much to the excitement in Augusta, and was very nigh producing serious difficulties in this quarter, the people believing it to be a reinforcement to my command. I had no previous knowledge of it whatever. On January 23d, Governor Brown, accompanied by his aide-de-camp, Hon. Henry R. Jackson, who had experienced military life as a colonel of a Georgia regiment in Mexico, and Col. William Phillips, visited Captain Elzey and made a verbal request that he withdraw his command from the State. Upon that officer's refusal, Col. Alfred Cumming, commanding the Augusta battalion of militia, was ordered to put his force in readiness for action to support the governor's demand. An official report succinctly describing an event of great importance at that period of the State's history, was made by Captain Elzey to Col. Samuel Cooper, adjutant-general of the United States army
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
te service in Virginia, at Pensacola and on our own coast, in all, some twenty-three regiments. Georgia has now to look to the shotguns and rifles in the hands of her people for coast defense, and to guns which her gunsmiths are slowly manufacturing. The report of the comptroller-general, made at the close of the fiscal year, June, 1861, showed that Georgia had put into the field or camp the following troops, exclusive of artillery: First regulars Col. C. J. Williams; First of Georgia, Col. H. W. Mercer; First volunteers, Col. J. N. Ramsey; Second volunteers, Col. Paul J. Semmes; Third volunteers, Col. H. R. Wright; Fourth volunteers, Col. George Doles; Fifth volunteers, Col. John K. Jackson; Sixth volunteers, Col. A. H. Colquitt; Seventh volunteers, Col. L. J. Gartrell; Eighth volunteers, Col: Francis S. Bartow; Ninth volunteers, Col. E. R. Goulding; Tenth volunteers, Col. Lafayette McLaws: Eleventh volunteers, Col. George T. Anderson; Twelfth volunteers, Col. Edward Johnson; T
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
in the district of Georgia, under Gen. H. W. Mercer, was reported in March as follows: Brigade of Gen. W. H. Taliaferro—Thirty-second regiment, Col. George P. Harrison; Forty-seventh regiment, Col. G. W. M. Williams; Fourth Louisiana battalion, Col. J. McEnery. Brigade of Gen. W. H. T. Walker—Twenty-fifth regiment, Col. C. C. Wilson; Twenty-ninth regiment, Col. William J. Young; Thirtieth regiment, Col. Thomas W. Mangham. Savannah river batteries and other defenses—First of Georgia, Col. C. H. Olmstead; Fifty-fourth regiment, Col. Charlton H. Way; Sixty-third regiment, Col. G. A. Gordon; First battalion sharpshooters, Capt. A. Shaaff; battalion Savannah volunteer guard, Maj. John Screven; Emmet rifles, Capt. George W. Anderson; Fourth cavalry, Col. D. L. Clinch; Fifth cavalry, Col. Robert H. Anderson; cavalry battalion, Maj. E. C. Anderson, Jr.; battalion partisan rangers, Maj. John M. Millen; Twenty-second battalion artillery, Col. E. C. Anderson; Chatham light artillery, Ca<
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
uly to December, 1863. The operations on the south Atlantic coast during the summer of 1863 were mainly concentrated at Charleston, where General Colquitt and his brigade were on duty. Col. C. H. Olmstead's regiment (the First of Georgia), the Fifty-fourth and the Nineteenth were on duty at Battery Wagner previous to the assault of July 11th. On that day there were in the garrison, consisting of South Carolina and Georgia troops, four companies of the First volunteer regiment of Georgia, Col. C. H. Olmstead; four companies of the Twelfth Georgia battalion, Lieut.-Col. H. D. Capers, and three companies of the Eighteenth Georgia battalion, Maj. W. S. Basinger. The three detachments numbered about 500 men, all under the command of Colonel Olmstead. The assault of the enemy was quickly repulsed. Col. R. F. Graham, of the Twenty-first South Carolina, commanding, reported as follows: My loss was 1 officer killed and 5 privates, 1 officer wounded and 5 privates, all from the Georgia t