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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 970 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 126 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 126 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 114 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 100 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 94 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 88 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 86 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 76 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 74 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) or search for Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) in all documents.

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Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, III. (search)
n been given illustrious descent. It is enough to know for certain that, Scotch in blood and American since 1630, he was of the eighth generation, and counted a grandfather in the Revolution, besides other soldier ancestors. The first Grant, Matthew, probably landed at Nantucket, Massachusetts, May 30, 1630. In 1636 he helped establish the town of Windsor, Connecticut. He was its first surveyor and a trusted citizen, Samuel, Solomon, Noah, Adoniram, that is what the Grants in colonial Connecticut were called. And with such names as these they did what all the other colonial Noahs and Adonirams were doing. None of them rose to uncommon dimensions; but they, and such as they, were then, as they are now, the salt and leaven of our country. After the Revolution, as our frontier widened and the salt and leaven began to be sprinkled westward, Captain Noah Grant went gradually to the Ohio River, leaving there no riches and many children. One of these, Jesse, became a tanner, and in 1
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant, IV. (search)
e than ever isolated. His quiet judgment, however, seems to have been wide-awake. He went to hear Douglas during the campaign of this year, and, being asked how he liked him, answered, He is a very able, at least a very smart man. And from having been a Democrat--so far as he was definitely anything political — his change of view dates from this occasion. The words of Douglas caused him to rejoice over Lincoln's election. Except his vote for Buchanan, his single political manifestation previous to this had been to join the Know-Nothings at St. Louis, and attend one meeting. But now he had listened to Douglas, and preferred Lincoln; and South Carolina had seceded. The state of the country became his one thought. It is interesting to reflect that South Carolina, the first state to leave the Union, sent one man in thirty-eight to the Revolution, while Grant's ancestral state, Connecticut, furnished one man in seven, or five times as many. Virginia furnished one in twenty-eight