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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 456 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 154 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 72 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 54 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 38 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Delaware (Delaware, United States) or search for Delaware (Delaware, United States) in all documents.

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of a third-rate city of the present day, and no harm would be likely to arise by leaving the territories to themselves until they have doubled the population of Delaware or Rhode Island in 1780. But would it not be incomparably better to admit them into the Union as States, with a much less population, than to leave them to be aississippi, whose slave property is rendered comparatively secure by the intervention of other slaveholding States between them and the free States, and not from Delaware, and Maryland, and Virginia, and Kentucky, and Tennessee, and Missouri, which lose a hundred slaves by abolition thieves where the first-named States lose one. fight the abolitionists, if fight they must, within the Union, where their adversaries are somewhat restrained by constitutional and legal obligations. No, sir; Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia do not intend to become the theatre of desolating wars between the North and the South; Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri do not intend t
ernment of necessity be too strong for the liberties of its own people, or too weak to maintain its own existence? So viewing the issue, no choice was left but to call out the war power of the Government, and so to resist the force employed for its destruction by force for its preservation. The call was made, and the response of the country was most gratifying, surpassing, in unanimity and spirit, the most sanguine expectation. Yet none of the States, commonly called slave States, except Delaware, gave a regiment through the regular State organization. A few regiments have been organized within some others of those States by individual enterprise, and received into the Government service. Of course the seceded States, so called, and to which Texas had been joined about the time of the inauguration, gave no troops to the cause of the Union. The Border States, so called, were not uniform in their action, some of them being almost for the Union, while in others, as in Virginia, Nort
rtment. All the other States promptly furnished the number required of them, except Maryland, whose Governor, though manifesting entire readiness to comply, was prevented from so doing by the outbreak at Baltimore. In the States of Virginia, Delaware, and Missouri, notwithstanding the positive refusal of their executive officers to cooperate with the Government, patriotic citizens voluntarily united together and organized regiments for the Government service. Delaware and Virginia furnishedDelaware and Virginia furnished each a regiment, both of which are on duty in the field. In a similar patriotic spirit, the loyal people of Missouri raised a force of 11,445 officers and men, making, in round numbers, twelve organized regiments, to sustain the Government and to put down rebellion in that State. And so, also, the citizens of the District of Columbia, emulating these honorable examples, furnished no less than 2,822 officers and men, making in all four full regiments, all of which are yet in the field, doing a
West, that slave labor would have been cheaper than hireling labor, that, transcending agriculture, it would have expanded to the arts; and that thus one homogeneous form of labor and one homogeneous form of society, unquestioned by one single dreamer, and cherished at home and honored abroad, would have overspread the entire available surface of the late United States. But the slave trade suppressed, democratic society has triumphed. The States of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware, found an attractive market for their slaves. They found a cheaper pauper labor to replace it; that pauper labor poured in from Europe; while it replaced the slave it increased the political power of the Northern States. More than 5,000,000 from abroad have been added to their number; that addition has enabled them to grasp and hold the government. That government, from the very necessities of their nature, they are forced to use against us. Slavery was within its grasp, and, forced to t
Doc. 112.-proclamation of Edward Clark, Governor of the State of Texas. Whereas, There is now a condition of actual hostility between the Government of the United States and the Confederate States of America, and, whereas, the Congress of the latter Government have recognized the existence of war with the United States, except the States of Tennessee, Missouri, Kentucky, Maryland, and Delaware, and the Territories thereof, except the Territories of Arizona, New Mexico, and the Indian Territories situated between Kansas and the State of Texas; and, whereas, the late intimate commercial and political association of the people of the State of Texas, and their hitherto continuous and extensive intercourse with those with whom Texas, as a member of the Confederate States of America, is now at war, might cause some of the citizens of said State, ignorantly, and others, possibly knowingly, to disregard the relations in which war between said Governments has placed them; and, whereas, I
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-General McClellan's command. (search)
s the extent of General McClellan's new command: war Department, Adjutant-General's office, Washington, July 25, 1861. First--There will be added to the Department of the Shenandoah the counties of Washington, Alleghany, in Maryland, and such other parts of Virginia as may be covered by the army in its operations. And there will be added to the Department of Washington the counties of Prince George, Montgomery, and Frederick. The remainder of Maryland, and all of Pennsylvania and Delaware, will constitute the Department of Pennsylvania, Headquarters Baltimore. The Department of Washington and the Department of Northeastern Virginia will constitute a geographical division under Major-General McClellan, United States Army, Headquarters Washington. Second--All officers of volunteer regiments will be subject to examination by a Military Board, to be appointed by this department with the concurrence of the General-in-Chief, as to their fitness for the positions assigned them.
States, and not citizens thereof, shall be liable to be apprehended, restrained, or secured, and removed as alien enemies; Provided, that, during the existing war, citizens of the United States residing within the Confederate States, with intent to become citizens thereof, and who shall make a declaration of such intention, in due form, and acknowledging the authority of the Government of the same, shall not become liable, as aforesaid, nor shall the act extend to citizens of the States of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Missouri, and the District of Columbia, and the Territories of Arizona and New Mexico, and the Indian Territory south of Kansas, who shall not be chargeable with actual hostility, or other crime against the public safety, and who shall acknowledge the authority of the Government of the Confederate States. Sec. 2. The President of the Confederate States shall be, and he is hereby, authorized by his proclamation or other public act, in case of existing or declared war,
fter the expiration of said period of forty days, that they will be treated as alien enemies: Provided, however, That this proclamation shall not be considered as applicable, during the existing war, to citizens of the United States residing within the Confederate States with intent to become citizens thereof, and who shall make a declaration of such intention in due form, acknowledging the authority of this Government; nor shall this proclamation be considered as extending to the States of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Missouri, the District of Columbia, the Territories of Arizona and New Mexico, and the Indian Territory south of Kansas, who shall not be chargeable with actual hostility or other crime against the public safety, and who shall acknowledge the authority of the Government of the Confederate States. And I do further proclaim and make known that I have established the rules and regulations hereto annexed, in accordance with the provisions of said law. Given under my h
Doc. 201.-Gen. McClellan's staff. Headquarters army of the Potomac, Washington, Aug. 20, 1861. In compliance with General Order No. 15, of August 17, 1861, from the Headquarters of the army, I hereby assume command of the Army of the Potomac, comprising the troops serving in the former departments of Washington and Northeastern Virginia, in the Valley of the Shenandoah, and in the States of Maryland and Delaware. The organization of the command into divisions and brigades will be announced hereafter. The following-named officers are attached to the staff of the Army of the Potomac: Major S. Williams, assistant adjutant-general; Captain Alex. V. Colburn, assistant adjutant-general; Col. R. B. Marcy, inspector-general; Col. T. M. Key, aide-de-camp; Capt. N. B. Swetzer, First Cavalry, aide-de-camp; Captain Edward McK. Hudson, Fourteenth infantry, aide-de-camp; Captain L. A. Williams, Tenth infantry, aide-de-camp; Major A. J. Myers, signal officer; Major Stewart Van Vleit,