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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 456 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 154 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 72 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 54 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 38 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Delaware (Delaware, United States) or search for Delaware (Delaware, United States) in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Contents of Thie first volume. (search)
tler's Correspondence,144 94.Gov. Magoffin's (Kentucky) Proclamation,144 95.Gen. Cass' Speech at Detroit, April 24,145 96.Caleb Cushing's Speech, April 24,145 97.Gov. Letcher's Proclamation, April 24,146 98.Van Dorn's Capture of N. Y. Troops in Texas,146 99.Geo. Law's Letter,147 100.St. Louis Arsenal — How the Arms were Taken,147 101.N. Y. 7th Regiment--Its March,148 102.Gov. Letches's Proclamation, April 25,154 103.Gov. Ellis' (North Carolina) Proclamation,155 104.Gov. Burton's (Delaware) Proclamation,155 105.New Military Departments,155 106.N. Y. 71st Regiment, Letters from,156 107.Washington--Oath of Allegiance,158 108.Women of New York, Address to,158 109.Gov. Hicks' Message to Maryland Legislature,159 110.Blockade of Virginia and North Carolina,161 111.Edward Everett's Speech, Boston, April 27,161 112.Fort Pickens, Reinforcement of,162 113.N. Y. S. M. 5th Regiment,163 114.Vice-President Hamlin's Speech, New York, April 24,163 115.New Orleans, Review of Confed
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Introduction. (search)
this tribute to the Southern planter. The growth of the native article, as we have seen, had not in 1794 reached a point to be known to Chief Justice Jay as one of actual or probable export. As late as 1796, the manufacturers of Brandywine in Delaware petitioned Congress for the repeal of this duty on imported cotton, and the petition was rejected on the Report of a Committee, consisting of a majority from the Southern States, on the ground, that to repeal the duty on raw cotton imported woul that short-lived and ill.compacted frame of Government. Accordingly, when the Constitution of the United States was formed, the great object and the main difficulty was to reconcile the equality of the States, (which gave to Rhode Island and Delaware equal weight with Virginia and Massachusetts,) with a proportionate representation of the people. Each of these principles was of vital importance; the first being demanded by the small States, as due to their equal independence, and the last b