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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 456 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 154 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 72 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 54 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 38 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Delaware (Delaware, United States) or search for Delaware (Delaware, United States) in all documents.

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vancing ideas, which, though scouted at in the early months of the war, were afterwards accepted by the nation, before the war could be brought to a successful end. Massachusetts is a small State, in territory and in population. With the exception of Maine, it lies the farthest eastward of all the States in the Union. Its capital is four hundred and fifty miles east of Washington, and is separated from it by the States of Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland. It contains seven thousand eight hundred square miles of land, river, lakes, and sea. In 1860, it had a population of 1,231,066, engaged in farming, manufacturing, fishing, and mercantile pursuits. Less than one-half the land is improved. It is about 1/380 part of the whole Union, ranking the thirty-sixth in size among the forty States and Territories. It is divided into fourteen counties, and three hundred and thirty-five cities and towns. Its governor, lieutenant-gover
egraphed to President Lincoln,— Massachusetts has to-day ratified the constitutional amendment abolishing slavery, by a unanimous yea and nay vote of both branches of the Legislature; the Democrats voting affirmatively. About the middle of February, a proposition was made, in the Senate of the United States, to repeal the law allowing the loyal States to enlist colored men for their quotas in the rebel States. Among the Senators who advocated the proposition was Mr. Saulsbury, of Delaware. In the course of his speech, he arraigned the government of Massachusetts as selfishly endeavoring to get colored troops to its own credit against the public interest; that it was trying to recruit men in Savannah ahead of the United States; and this was made the ground for repealing the section allowing recruiting in rebel States. On the 18th of February, the Governor wrote to John B. Alley, Representative in Congress from the Essex district, calling his attention to Mr. Saulsbury's spe