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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 932 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 544 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 208 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 116 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 98 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 96 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 94 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 86 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 84 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 78 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Florida (Florida, United States) or search for Florida (Florida, United States) in all documents.

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he Free States north of the river Ohio. Can anybody suppose that this population can be severed by a line that divides them from the territory of a foreign and alien Government, down somewhere, the Lord knows where, upon the lower banks of the Mississippi? What will become of Missouri? Will she join the arrondissement of the Slave States? Shall the man from the Yellow Stone and the Platte be connected in the new republic with the man who lives on the southern extremity of the Cape of Florida? Sir, I am ashamed to pursue this line of remark. I dislike it — I have an utter disgust for it. I would rather hear of natural blasts and mildews, war, pestilence and famine, than to hear gentlemen talk of secession. To break up! to break up this great Government! to dismember this great country! to astonish Europe with an act of folly such as Europe, for two centuries, has never beheld in any Government! No, sir! no, sir! There will be no secession. Gentlemen are not serious whe
sovereignty than this could be claimed; for it asserts the right of a single State, a part of the Nation — whether it be Florida with her 82,000 white inhabitants, or New York with her 3,800,000--to abrogate, as to itself, the supreme law of the lan his entrance upon her territory, and ends with his departure from it. Will it be said that he who was once a citizen of Florida, but removed thence to Missouri, where he has since resided, may now be called back by Florida to fight her battles, becFlorida to fight her battles, because of his former citizenship there? No sane man will hold such a doctrine; and yet if Florida may not do that, there is no allegiance to a State, except in the sense of obedience to its laws and authorities while in it. But the United States haveFlorida may not do that, there is no allegiance to a State, except in the sense of obedience to its laws and authorities while in it. But the United States have an undoubted and indestructible right to call forth their citizens from every spot of their domain, to defend and uphold in battle the honor and power of the nation; for no citizen can find a place where the title of allegiance does not bind him to
slation. At the beginning of the present Presidential term, four months ago, the functions of the Federal Government were found to be generally suspended within the several States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida, excepting only those of the Post-Office Department. Within these States all the Forts, Arsenals, Dock-Yards, Custom-Houses, and the like, including the movable and stationary property in and about them, had been seized, and were held in openwith money the countries out of which several of these States were formed. Is it just that they shall go off without leave and without refunding? The nation paid very large sums in the aggregate, I believe nearly a hundred millions, to relieve Florida of the aboriginal tribes. Is it just that she shall now be off without consent or without any return? The nation is now in debt for money applied to the benefit of these so-called seceding States, in common with the rest. Is it just, either t
861. The following particulars of the affair at Monroe, being gathered from parties that were present, may be considered substantially correct. On Monday, Colonel Smith, hearing that the State troops, under General Harris, were encamped near Florida, left Monroe Station with a force of 500 men, to disperse them. After passing Florida, and when a short distance north of one of the fords of Salt River, on the other side of which the State troops were encamped, his force was suddenly fired upFlorida, and when a short distance north of one of the fords of Salt River, on the other side of which the State troops were encamped, his force was suddenly fired upon from the roadside by about 200 of Harris's command. At this spot there was an open field, lying to the right of the road, and about eighty yards in width. The State troops, who were a mounted scouting party, had left their horses a short distance back in the woods, and fired in ambush from the opposite side of the field. The only person injured by the fire was Capt. McAllister, of the 16th Illinois Regiment, who was mortally wounded. The Federal forces returned the fire without effect,
eration shall be made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress of the Confederate States, and within every subsequent term of ten years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. The number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every fifty thousand, but each State shall have at least one Representative; and until such enumeration shall be made, the State of South Carolina shall be entitled to choose six; the State of Georgia ten; the State of Alabama nine; the State of Florida two; the State of Mississippi seven; the State of Louisiana six; and the State of Texas six. 4. When vacancies happen in the representation of any State, the Executive authority thereof shall issue writs of election to, fill such vacancies. 5. The House of Representatives shall choose their Speaker and other officers; and shall have the sole power of impeachment; except that any judicial or other federal officer resident and acting solely within the limits of any State, may be imp
cott. 8.James M. Mason. 9.J. Brockenbrough. 10.Chas. W. Russell. 11.Robert Johnston. 12.Walter Staples. 13.Walter Preston. North Carolina.  Geo. Davis.  W. W. Avery. 1.W. N. H. Smith. 2.Thomas Ruffin. 3.T. D. McDowell. 4.A. W. Venable. 5.J. M. Morehead. 6.R. C. Puryer. 7.Burton Craige. 8.E. A. Davidson. Alabama. 1.R. W. Walker. 2.R. H. Smith. 3.J. L. M. Curry. 4.W. P. Chilton. 5.S. F. Hale. 6.Collin S. McRae. 7.John Gill Shorter. 8.David P. Lewis. 9.Thomas Fearn. Florida. 1.Jackson Morton. 2.J. P. Anderson. 3.J. B. Owens. Georgia. 1.Robert Toombs. 2.Howell Cobb. 3.Francis S. Bartow. 4.Martin J. Crawford. 5.Eugenius A. Nisbot. 6.Benjamin H. Hill. 7.A. R. Wright. 8.Thomas R. R. Cobb. 9.Augustus H. Kenan. 10.Alex. H. Stephens. Louisiana. 1.John Perkins, Jr. 2.A. De Clouet. 3.Charles H. Conrad. 4.D. F. Kenner. 5.Edward Sparrow. 6.Henry Marshall. Mississippi. 1.Wiley P. Harris. 2.Walter Brooke. 3.W. S. Wilson. 4.A. M. Clayton. 5.W. S.
losophy which he inculcates in the name and on behalf of the secession movement. Yet the prominent part he has taken in the steps by which that movement was initiated, the confidence bestowed upon him by the people of Charleston in electing him, with such unanimity, to a seat in the South Carolina Convention, and the marked honor conferred upon him by that Convention in deputing him as one of the commissioners appointed to interpret the action of the Palmetto State before the Convention of Florida, (the first which met after that of South Carolina,) are all so many titles by which he may assume to speak with authority in expounding the purport and bearing of the civil revolution to which he has so largely contributed. It will be seen that Mr. Spratt distinctly and unequivocally heralds a new crusade for the emancipation of the South, if the features engrafted on the Provisional Constitution framed at Montgomery should be so far incorporated in the permanent organic law of the new
r, he could not possibly have escaped, except at the loss of thousands of prisoners and all his batteries, while the field would have been strewed with his dead. Finding that his orders had in some way failed to be executed, Gen. Beauregard at last ordered up a portion of the forces which were intended to cooperate with Gen. Ewell. It was late, however, before these reinforcements came up. Only one brigade reached the field before the battle was won. This was led by Gen. E. K. Smith, of Florida, formerly of the United States army, and was a part of Gen. Johnston's column from Winchester. They should have reached here the day before, but were prevented by an accident on the railroad. They dashed on the charge with loud shouts and in the most gallant style. About the same time Major Elzey coming down the railroad from Winchester with the last of Johnston's brigades, and hearing the firing, immediately quit the train and struck across the country, encountered the extreme right of
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 114.-the Cherokees and the war. (search)
sed between the chief of the Cherokee nation and various rebel authorities and citizens of Arkansas: State of Arkansas, Executive Department, little Rock, Jan. 29, 1861. To His Excellency John Ross, Principal Chief of Cherokee Nation:-- sir: It may now be regarded as almost certain that the States having slave property within their borders will, in consequence of repeated Northern aggressions, separate themselves and withdraw from the Federal Government. South Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Georgia, and Louisiana have already, by action of the people, assumed this attitude. Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, North Carolina, and Maryland will probably pursue the same course by the 4th of March next. Your people, in their institutions, productions, latitude, and natural sympathies, are allied to the common brotherhood of the slave-holding States. Our people and yours are natural allies in war, and friends in peace. Your country is salubrious
Doc. 124 1/2.-Florida ordinance of secession. Adopted January 11, 1861. Whereas, All hope of preserving the Union upon terms consistent with the safety and hory sentiment of the Free States; therefore, Be it resolved by the people of Florida, in Convention assembled, That it is undoubtedly the right of the several Stat, in the opinion of this Convention, the existing causes are such as to compel Florida to proceed to exercise that right. We, the people of the State of Florida iState of Florida in Convention assembled, do solemnly ordain, publish, and declare that the State of Florida hereby withdraws herself from the Confederacy of States existing under the State of Florida hereby withdraws herself from the Confederacy of States existing under the name of the United States of America, and from the existing Government of the said States; and that all political connection between her and the Government of said Stme is hereby totally annulled, and said Union of States dissolved; and the State of Florida is hereby declared a sovereign and independent nation; and that all ordina
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