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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The Foresight of Mr. Fielder. (search)
nd called Incledon, while listening to the performances of Braham, was accustomed to wish that his old music-master could come down from heaven to Exeter and take the mail-coach up to London, to hear that d — d Jew sing. Mr. Herbert Fielder, of Georgia, who is the latest champion of disunion, and who appears to have muddled himself into something like sincerity by too much reading of Mr. Calhoun, in a pamphlet which he has put out, and for which he charges the incredibly small sum of fifty cenvelty. If he does, he is very much mistaken. We think we may say, in conclusion, that so far as Mr. Fielder is concerned, the Union is already dissolved. The case now stands thus: Thirty-two sovereign States versus Herbert Fielder, Esq., of Georgia. Mr. Fielder has not, at the latest dates, proceeded so far as to seize the public arsenals, post-offices, revenue cutters, etc., but we presume that he will do so at his earliest convenience — that he will elect himself to all necessary offices
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The Montgomery Muddle — a specimen day. (search)
nder? Then, too, we are sorry to say that the Congress, on this same specimen day, wasted its precious time in hearing petitions for patents, and in referring them. Now when we consider that discovery and invention are shown by the facts and the figures to be quite out of the Southern line, we cannot but regret to see the energy of the Congress wasted in raising a Patent Committee at all. In 1856--and other years will show a like proportion--South Carolina took out seven letters patent; Georgia, nine; Florida, one; Alabama, eleven; Louisiana, twenty-four; all the Slave States, two hundred and ninety-one against one thousand nine hundred and eighty-two taken out by the Free States. There would seem to be several things making more imperative demands upon the Confederate Congress than a Patent Office. A poor but honest State, struggling with financial difficulties, and striving in good faith to secure a position in the family of nations, is worthy of the respect of all mankind;
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Alexander the Bouncer. (search)
Alexander the Bouncer. all great men have their weak side. Alexander of Macedon was given to grog. Alexander, of Georgia, V. P. C. S., is given to gammon. His weakness is to say the thing that is not --this being the periphrastical way in which Dean Swift's fastidious Houyhnhnms always spoke of falsehood and of falsifiers. The Hon. Y. P. Alex. Ham. Stephens upon arriving at Atlanta, Ga., was received by a large crowd; and in return he ungratefully made a speech calculated largely to delude the large crowd, and considerably to lower himself in the estimation of old-fashioned folk with a prejudice in favor of the truth. From a great variety of mendacities, we select, the following as being, to use the words of Goldsmith, the damnable bounce of the occasion. A threatening war is upon us, made by those who have no regard for right. We fight for our homes! They for money. The hirelings and mercenaries of the North are all hand and hand against you. Now, Stephens, what d
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The Trial of Toombs. (search)
to live. Gen. Robert Toombs, of the Secession service, ought, by all the laws which regulate rebellion, to give up cotton-growing; but he finds the temptation to keep on with the cultivation too strong for him, and leaves his blacks at work in Georgia while he militates in Virginia. Randolph County, Ga., instantly lapses into a patriotic perspiration. The Randolph County Committee of Public Safety immediately communicate savagely with Toombs in Richmond. They tell him that he is a very wicllection of blacks. That lie would, if he could, truss up the august Committee, and give to each member of it a round dozen of stripes, with the accompanying pickle, we do also believe. That, after his soldiering is over, should he get back to Georgia--which is n't probable-he will shoot one or two Committee-men, is very probable. His appetite is for the plecasures of Secession — he has none for the pais--just as a man may never weary of talking of the weariness of life, but may shrink from