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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 3 document sections:

Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Contents of Thie first volume. (search)
9.Alabama Ordinance of Secession,19 20.N. Y. State Resolutions,21 21.Capt. McGowan's Report of Star of the West,21 22.Georgia Ordinance of Secession,21 23.Jefferson Davis's Speech on leaving the Senate,22 24.Sherrard Clemens' Speech,22 25.Lond Guard, &c.,177 122.28th Regiment N. Y. S. M.,178 123.Philadelphia Letter to Gen. Scott,178 124.Baptist Convention in Georgia,179 125.Gen. Harney's Letter,179 126.Albany Burgess Corps,181 127.South Carolina College Cadets,181 128.Religious Pr9th Regiment,301 207.Gen. Cadwallader and Judge Taney,301 208.Edw. Bates' Letters to J. M. Botts,304 209.New York and Georgia--Correspondence on Property,306 210.Garibaldi Guard, New York City Regiment,307 211.Meeting of Baptists at Brooklyn, M. Butler and Sec. Cameron,313 216.Maine 2d Regiment Volunteers,314 217.W. H. Russell's Letters from South Carolina and Georgia, April 30-May 1,314 218.New York 7th Regiment (S. M.) Papers,318 219.Maine 1st Regiment Volunteers,320 220.Fight at A
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Appendix C, p. 31. (search)
they cried havoc, and let loose upon us all the dogs of war. And how stands it mow? Why, in this very quarter of a century our slaves have doubled in numbers, and each slave has more than doubled in value. The very negro who, as a prime laborer, would have brought $400 in 1828, would now, with thirty more years upon him, sell for $800. Equally strong admissions were made by A. H. Stephens, now Vice-President of the Confederacy, in that carefully prepared speech which he delivered in Georgia in July, 1859, on the occasion of retiring from public life. He then said:-- Nor am I of the number of those who believe that we have sustained any injury by these agitations. It is true, we were not responsible for them. We were not the aggressors. We acted on the defensive. We repelled assault, calumny, and aspersion, by argument, by reason, and truth. But so far from the institution of African slavery in our section being weakened or rendered less secure by the discussion, my
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Introduction. (search)
on) according to the report in the Milledge-ville papers. Causes alleged by Georgia: the Fishing Bounties. And what, think you, was the grievance in the front to an annual sum of 200,005 dollars! Such is the portentous grievance which in Georgia stands at the head of the acts of oppression, for which, although repealed in ct. More money was expended by the United States in removing the Indians from Georgia, eight or ten times as much was expended for the same object in Florida, as haSouth Carolina declared that Cotton was in contemplation in South Carolina and Georgia, and if good seed could be procured he hoped it might succeed. On this hope tpon them by this protecting duty, to enable the planters of South Carolina and Georgia to explore the tropics for a variety of cotton seed adapted to their climate. triction was enacted, all the members of Mr. Monroe's Cabinet--Mr. Crawford of Georgia, Mr. Calhoun of South Carolina, and Mr. Wirt of Virginia — concurred with Mr.