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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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g Post. It was originally told nearly thirty years ago, by an eye-witness: the Spotted hand. the other morning, at the breakfast table, when I, an unobserved spectator, happened to be present, Calhoun was observed to gaze frequently at his right hand and brush it with his left in a hurried and nervous manner. He did this so often that it excited attention. At length one of the persons comprising the breakfast party — his name, I think, is Toombs, and he is a member of Congress from Georgia--took upon himself to ask the occasion of Mr. Calhoun's disquietude. Does your hand pain you? he asked of Mr. Calhoun. To this Mr. Calhoun replied, in rather a hurried manner, Pshaw! it is nothing but a dream I had last night, and which makes me see perpetually a large black spot, like an ink blotch, upon the back of my right hand; an optical illusion, I suppose. Of course these words excited the curiosity of the company, but no one ventured to beg the details of this singular dream, u
Governor Brown, of Georgia; has solicited from the Secretary of War, and obtained, a year's leave of absence for Colonel Hardee, late Commandant at West Point, to go to Europe to purchase guns and munitions of war for the State of Georgia.--N Y. Times, Dec. 27. Governor Brown, of Georgia; has solicited from the Secretary of War, and obtained, a year's leave of absence for Colonel Hardee, late Commandant at West Point, to go to Europe to purchase guns and munitions of war for the State of Georgia.--N Y. Times, Dec. 27.
It is said that Mr. Buchanan is doing all he can to favor the schemes of the revolutionists. The conduct of Major Anderson, in evacuating Fort Moultrie and taking up a stronger position at Fort Sumter, is understood to meet the decided disapprobation of the Administration. It seems he acted without orders. Government arms have been sold to the State of Georgia by the Secretary of War, and there is reason to believe that the President will take no measures to suppress any revolutionary efforts which may be made by Southerns.--Idem.
In addition to Bates of Missouri, Cabinet places have been offered by Mr. Lincoln to Alexander H. Stephens of Georgia, and Robert T. Scott of Virginia.--N. Y. Evening Post, Dec. 31. the Raleigh Standard says: North Carolina still commands us to obey the Federal laws and to respect the Federal authorities. Up to this moment these laws and these authorities have breathed nothing but respect for our State, and have offered nothing but protection to our citizens. It will be time enough to talk about levying war and capturing forts when the State shall have dissolved her relations with the Union. She has not done so yet, and we trust that no such step will be required. She is too brave to run out of the Union under temporary panics, and she is too wise to commit herself to revolution for the purpose merely of imitating the examples of other States.
a great lack of food, business is prostrated; the people are idle, and patrols are wandering up and down to preserve order. On the day Com. Shubrick left there was unusual excitement, and upon inquiry he found that news had been received that the steamer Macedonian was on her way with eight hundred troops to bombard the city and reinforce Major Anderson. He could not convince them to the contrary, and expresses the opinion that they cannot hold out in their present condition long, unless Georgia comes to their relief. No vessel entered or left the harbor while they were there. The Tribune has the following editorial paragraph: We learn, through a private letter, from a perfectly responsible. source in Charleston, that the other day a body of twenty minute-men from the country entered a large private house in that city and demanded dinner. A dinner was given them, and then they demanded ten dollars each, saying that they had not come to Charleston for nothing; and the mo
. Several weeks ago, five hundred cases of muskets were shipped to Savannah, to supply, it is said, the legal demand of Georgia for her quota of guns from the United States. There was no mystery about the transaction. The arms came down the Hudsopment had occurred at any other time, it would have caused no remark. Its occurrence now is explained by the fact, that Georgia had previously neglected to draw out the quota of arms to which she was entitled, and which the General Government couldther State, as long as it remains in the Union, should not exercise the same right. It is a little singular that the State of Georgia should be entitled to a quota of ten thousand stand of arms, that being the number contained in five hundred cases, The muskets are worth about $11 50 each, so that the ten thousand would cost $115,000. Now, if we reflect that the State of Georgia constituted, in 1850, only one-thirtieth part of the Union, and that, at the present time, it bears a still smaller
Feb. 14.--Some time ago it was gravely proposed in South Carolina to abolish the Fourth of July, and to select some other day for the annual occasion of blowing off the surplus patriotism of the Palmettoes. In the course of the popular revolt several favorite national airs were pronounced against, struck from the music books, and replaced by sundry French revolutionary melodies, with variations to suit the peculiar phases of South Carolina Jacobinism. More temperate counsels prevailed in Georgia, and the Savannah Republican, after commending the action of the Southern Confederacy in reviving the government and constitution of the fathers, calls upon the Congress to re-erect the stars and stripes as their national flag, and resume upon the Southern lyre those glorious old tunes, Hail Columbia, and The Star-spangled Banner. Yesterday this question came up in the Congress. Mr. Brooke, of Mississippi, protested that the stars and stripes were the idol of his heart, when Mr. Miles
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), A New Phase of the Georgia seizures. (search)
A New Phase of the Georgia seizures. According to the Savannah Republican, Governor Brown of Georgia acted hastily in seizing the New York vessels. Governor Morgan did not refuse to accede to the demand for the surrender of the arms seized by the police of this city. On receiving the telegraphic message from Governor Brown he wrote to inquire as to its authenticity; and (says the Republican) so far as appears, he gave no intimation of his intention to refuse the demand for the. arms. The same paper adds this significant paragraph, from which it is to be inferred that Governor Brown hoped to accomplish a master-stroke by an act of devotion to the South, so as to strengthen his claims for a prominent place in the new Confederation: Under these circumstances it were impossible to beat it out of the brains of some uncharitable persons that our Governor, in his hasty proceedings, was quite as intent on bringing something from Montgomery as he was from New York. For ourselves,
, called Shay's insurrection, in Massachusetts. The third was in 1794, popularly called The whisky insurrection of Pennsylvania. The fourth was in 1814, by the Hartford Convention Federalists. The fifth--on which occasion the different sections of the Union came into collision — was in 1820, under the administration of President Monroe, and occurred on the question of the admission of Missouri into the Union. The sixth was a collision between the Legislature of Georgia and the Federal Government, in regard to certain lands, given by the latter to the Creek Indians. The seventh was in 1820, with the Cherokees, in Georgia. The eighth was the memorable nullifying ordinance of South Carolina, in 1832. The ninth was in 1842, and occurred in Rhode Island, between the Suffrage Association and the State authorities. The tenth was in 1856, on the part of the Mormons, who resisted Federal authority. The eleventh, the present (1861) rebellion in the Southern States.
The Charleston Courier is credibly informed that Gov. Brown of Georgia, has attached the Northern stock in the Macon and Western Railroad, amounting to about one million of dollars.--Times Telegram, March 10.
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