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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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doned when we marched up here a month ago — required considerable labor. From the time of the occupation of Yorktown, about a year ago, by the rebel General Magruder, two thousand slaves have been constantly employed, principally on the fortifications in the immediate vicinity of Yorktown and across the river at Gloucester. These have been assisted by the effective rebel force, some seven thousand men, which Gen. Magruder has had under his command. They were composed chiefly of Virginia, Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana troops. The fortifications of Yorktown are in the general shape of an elongated triangle, with the river for the base. In length they are five eighths of a mile. They are strong, but not neat. They might have been taken by storm with terrible loss; could have been taken by turning their right on the Warwick, after a severe battle; but have been taken without loss of any kind. One man was killed and three wounded by the explosion of a shell, attached to a torpedo
inch, left its shelter, and on the open field, a broad and beautiful expanse, undertook to advance rapidly upon him, he had recourse to the bayonet, and led the splendid charge which must forever be honorably associated with his name. It was a marvellous encounter, and our men speak highly of the bearing of the foe. The field was literally strewn with the dead and dying, and it is believed that the enemy nowhere suffered so severely. His force is said to have consisted of North-Carolina, Georgia, and Virginia troops. Already our troops had begun the solemn work of burying the rebel dead on the right. The bodies had, many of them, been gathered from the field, and conveyed to different points where pits had been dug for their reception. I halted at several of these to look at the mangled remains. Death had found the unfortunate victims in various attitudes. One was in the act of raising his gun to fire, and had stiffened in the same position — another was opening his cartridg
a wound in the ankle from a shell passing through the small bone of the leg. The Twelfth Georgia regiment did most of the fighting, and suffered very severely. They lost 132 killed, wounded and missing; among them were many brave and gallant officers. One company of the Twelfth Georgia lost all of its officers save the fourth corporal. There were only two brigades of three regiments each, both of Johnson's army, engaged in the fight. The first was commanded by Col. Z. T. Connor, of Georgia, and the second by Col. Wm. C. Scott, of Virginia, of both of whom Gen. Johnson speaks in the highest terms for their gallantry and bravery on this occasion. We expected to renew the fight the next morning; but the bird had flown, leaving behind, at McDowell, where three thousand encamped, all his camp equipage, a large quantity of ammunition, a number of cases of Enfield rifles, together with about one hundred head of cattle, which they had stolen, being mostly milch cows. At McDowel
ot to hold, and the Fourth North-Carolina and other regiments in support fell back in good order, waiting new dispositions and additional force. These were at hand, and the fight opened in front with terrific violence. Latham's and Carter's few pieces opened upon them, and belched forth grape and canister, scattering death in every direction, ploughing up the ground and cutting down the timber like so many twigs; so with banners flying and loud shouts along the line, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Virginia, Louisiana, South and North-Carolina regiments advanced to the charge, and drove the invaders like sheep before them, not stopping to breathe until three miles beyond the enemy's camps. In full possession of Barker's farm, and all the enemy's works, camps, stores, guns, etc., etc., it was thought the fight was over, (now about six P. M.;) but attempting to flank us on the left, and regain all they had lost, the enemy made a final and desperate effort to force the position held by
Doc. 28.-Emancipation of slaves. General Hunter's proclamation, May 9. headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina, comprising the military department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them utates of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law, in a free country, are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States--Georgia, Florida and South-Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-General Commanding. Ed. W. Smith, Acting Adjutant-General.
Doc. 42.-President Lincoln's proclamation. By the President of the United States. A proclamation. Whereas, There appears in the public prints what purports to be a proclamation of Major-General Hunter, in the words and figures following, to wit: headquarters Department of the South Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General orders No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida, and South-Carolina, comprising the Military Department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the twenty-fifth day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law in a free country are altogether incompatible. The persons in these three States, Georgia, Florida, and South-Carolina, heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. David Hunter, Major-Ge
while the forests were obscured with musket-mist. Our picket-reserves, however, held their ground manfully, and the enemy was briskly driven back, our lads yelling at them triumphantly. Hancock was victorious after a bitter fight, in which two Georgia regiments were almost cut to pieces. Our loss, though not half so great as that of the enemy, was not trifling. Among the prisoners captured by Hancock, was one of the smartest and most mischievous of Southern politicians, Col. J. Q. C. Lamar,ion of Whiting's, Hood's, and Pender's brigades, who flanked the enemy and formed our left, they never could be made to falter; for Whiting had the Eleventh, Sixteenth and Second Mississippi, and two other regiments. Hood had four Texan and one Georgia regiment, and the material of Pender's command was equally as good as any, and greatly distinguished itself. These were the troops most engaged, and that suffered most. But where is Jackson? ask all. He has travelled fast and is heading the
D. 1862, entitled, An act for the collection of direct taxes in insurrectionary districts within the United States, and for other purposes, it is made the duty of the President to declare, on or before the first day of July then next following, by his proclamation, in what States and parts of States insurrection exists: Now, therefore, be it known that I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaim that the States of South-Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, North-Carolina, and the State of Virginia, except the following counties, Hancock, Brooke, Ohio, Marshall, Wetzel, Marion, Monongalia, Preston, Taylor, Pleasants, Tyler, Ritchie, Doddridge, Harrison, Wood, Jackson, Wirt, Roane, Calhoun, Gilmer, Barbour, Tucker, Lewis, Braxton, Upshur, Randolph, Mason, Putnam, Kanawha, Clay, Nicholas, Cabell, Wayne, Boone, Logan, Wyoming, Webster, Fayette, and Raleigh, are now in insurrection and
he rebel conscription law. Jeff Davis's letter to Gov. Brown of Georgia. Executive Department, Richmond, May 29. dear sir: I receihether the conscription law was necessary in order to raise men in Georgia, the answer must have been in the negative. Your noble State has 't, Jefferson Davis. His Excellency, Joseph E. Brown, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville. Doc. 100.-Gen. Butler's order on currency. Brigadier-General Anderson, of North-Carolina; General Lawton, of Georgia, in leg; General Wright, of Georgia, in leg; General Ripley, of SoGeorgia, in leg; General Ripley, of South-Carolina, in throat; Colonel Duncan McRea, who succeeded Ripley in command, slightly; Colonel Magill, of Georgia regulars, lost an arm; MGeorgia regulars, lost an arm; Majors Sorrell and Walton, of Longstreet's staff; Colonel Gordon and Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot, of the Sixth Alabama, Captain Reedy, of thenderson, wounded in hip, not dangerously. Brig.-Gen. Wright, of Georgia, flesh wounds in breast and leg. Brig.-Gen. Lawton, in leg.
Doc. 99.-the rebel conscription law. Jeff Davis's letter to Gov. Brown of Georgia. Executive Department, Richmond, May 29. dear sir: I received your letter of the eighth inst., in due course, but the importance of the subject embraced in it required careful consideration; and this, together with other pressing duties, past year affords the amplest justification for your assertion that if the question had been, whether the conscription law was necessary in order to raise men in Georgia, the answer must have been in the negative. Your noble State has promptly responded to every call that it has been my duty to make on her; and to you, personallyrsonally, as her Executive, I acknowledge my indebtedness for the prompt, cordial, and effective cooperation you have afforded me in the effort to defend our common country against the common enemy. I am, very respectfully, your ob't serv't, Jefferson Davis. His Excellency, Joseph E. Brown, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville.
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