hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 6 document sections:

James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Introduction — the Federal Navy and the blockade (search)
ola fort--1861. where the blockaders came too late Many of these soldiers pictured here were soon fighting miles away from where we see them now; a great many were drafted from New Orleans, from Mobile, Savannah, and Charleston; Florida and Georgia furnished their full quota to the Confederate army. This photograph was taken by Edwards, of New Orleans, who, like his confrere Lytle, succeeded in picturing many of the stirring scenes and opening tableaux of the war; they afterward took advaays Charles Francis Adams, It may safely be claimed that the running of the forts at the mouth of the Mississippi and the consequent fall of New Orleans was as brilliant an operation, and one as triumphantly conducted, as Sherman's march through Georgia, which, as he mentions later, was itself made possible by the undisputed maritime supremacy of the North. Throttling the Confederacy by the blockade throughout, he says, the navy was also a spear-thrust in its back. Great, however, as was th
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Confederate Navy (search)
phen Russell Mallory, secretary of the Confederate states navy The beginning of the Confederate navy--ruins of the Norfolk navy-yard, 1862 and its dearth of even the nucleus of any naval force. The secession of Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana in quick succession made for a sure commencement of hostilities. In February, 1861, delegates from the seceding States met at Montgomery, Alabama, and organized a new provisional Government; the breach had widened beyond all hope a rope-walk capable of making all kinds of cordage from a rope-yarn to a 9-inch cable and able to turn out eight thousand yards per month. This was in addition to the eighteen shipbuilding yards already planned and in operation. The ladies of Georgia had presented to the Confederate States a floating battery that was partially finished at the end of the first year of the war. The State of Alabama had turned over an iron-clad ram as a gift to the Confederate service. Most of the ships that
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
aden with cloth and percussion-caps. The Jamestown was ordered to the East Indies September 11, 1862, where she remained till after the war's close. She had a roving commission full of adventure. Admiral S. P. Lee North Atlantic blockading squadron, 1862 A fast sailer the sloop-of-war Jamestown took command of the North Atlantic, guarding the coast of Virginia and North Carolina, while Flag-Officer Du Pont was assigned to the South Atlantic, guarding the coasts of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. The Gulf Squadron also was divided: Flag-Officer McKean took command of the East Gulf from Cape Canaveral to Pensacola, and Flag-Officer Farragut was assigned to the command of the West Gulf from Pensacola to Matamoras. When Port Royal was taken by Du Pont and Farragut had captured New Orleans, the navy had not only established bases but had entered wedges into the very vitals of the Confederacy. After holding the command of the North Atlantic Squadron for little short of a
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The actions with the forts (search)
garrison and as a notification to General Butler that he could bring in the transports with the troops. The landing and attack took place on Christmas Day. The fire from the ships was slow and methodical, as at target practice. Great holes were dug in the parapets by the gigantic Fort McAllister. In this picture of December, 1864, the Federal vessels lie peaceful before the Fort so impregnable to their attacks early the preceding year. The shore appearing below was lined with Georgia sharpshooters by Captain George W. Anderson, Jr., commander of the Fort when the monitor Montauk and four gunboats advanced to the attack of Feb. 1, 1863. The Montauk, under Commander John Lorimer Worden, hero of the original Monitor, was the first Federal ironclad to arrive in Ossabaw Sound. Early on January 27th, it furiously attacked the fort. On this occasion the Federal vessels did not attempt to cross the line of piles and torpedoes. The Confederates were confident that in the sec
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
end of the month sailed for Europe. On June 11th, the Alabama entered the harbor of Cherbourg, France, in order to coal and to refit. What happened to her now will be told at the end of this chapter. Among other Confederate cruisers was the Georgia, bought in March, 1863, by one of the Confederate agents, Commander Matthew F. Maury, the distinguished hydrographer. The Georgia started from England, but her sail power was found to be so small that she was constantly compelled to enter port Georgia started from England, but her sail power was found to be so small that she was constantly compelled to enter port to take on coal. This circumstance made her useless for long cruises, and she was taken to Liverpool and sold, after a year's activity in the Middle and South Atlantic. The Victor, an old despatch-boat of the British navy, was also bought by Commander Maury and, as the Rappahannock, was long detained in the harbor of Calais. With neither of these vessels was it possible to duplicate the Alabama, and, as yet, the whaling industry in the Pacific had been quite free from the unwelcome attenti
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
rate navies were engaged, based on official records. Minor engagements are omitted; also joint operations where the army played the principal part. March, 1861. March 20, 1861. Sloop Isabella, with provisions, for the Federal Navy-Yard at Pensacola, seized at Mobile by request of Gen. Bragg. April, 1861. April 17, 1861. Seizure of the U. S. transport Star of the West, at Indianola, by Texas troops under Col. Van Dorn. April 19, 1861. Ports of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas ordered blockaded by President Lincoln. April 20-21, 1861. Gosport Navy-Yard, Norfolk, Va., abandoned by Union officers in charge, and seized by Virginia State troops. April 27, 1861. Ports of Virginia and North Carolina included in the blockade. May, 1861. May 4, 1861. S. S. Star of the West made the receiving ship of the Confed. navy, New Orleans, La. May 9, 1861. U. S. ships Quaker City, Harriet Lane