hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga-letter from Captain W. N. Polk. (search)
ntain, goes through Lafayette — distant some twenty-two miles from Chattanooga — and Summerville within twenty-five miles of Rome. From Caperton's ferry there is a road leading over Sand mountain into Wills's valley at Trenton, and from Trenton to Lafayette and Dalton, over Lookout mountain, through Cooper's and Stevens's gaps, into McLemore's cove, and over Pigeon mountain by Dug gap. The road from Trenton, following Will's valley, exposed by easy communications, Rome, and through it Western Georgia and Eastern Alabama, with easy access to the important central positions, Atlanta and Selma. The General commanding believing a flanking movement to be the purpose of the enemy in his movements on the left, ordered Lieutenant-General Hill on Monday, September 7th, to move with his corps to Lafayette, and General Polk to Lee and Gordon's mill, and Major-General Buckner, with the Army of East Tennessee, and Major-General Walker, with his division from the Army of Mississippi, to concen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The true story of Andersonville told by a Federal prisoner (search)
artening circumstances would permit. We were often a fortnight without being able to get medicine. They had no quinine for fever and ague; they had no opium for diarrhoea and dysentery. Our government made medicine a contraband of war, and wherever they found medicine on a blockade runner, it was confiscated, a policy which indicated, on the part of our rulers, both ignorance and barbaric cruelty; for, although no amount of medicine would save many of our men who have laid their bones in Georgia, I am as certain as I am of my own existence, that hundreds of men died, who, if we had had the right sort and proper quantity of medicine, would have been living to-day and restored to their families. Scurvy was another disease which was making formidable inroads upon the health of the prisoners, but vegetables could not be had for love or money, although for miles the country was scoured, and I knew Chief Surgeon White to pay from a hundred to two hundred dollars for a quantity of squa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of John C. Mitchel, of Ireland, killed whilst in command of Fort Sumter. (search)
d after he came to the United States was employed in several parts of the country laying out some of the railroads that bind our widely extended States together with their iron bands. As soon as war was declared, and the Confederate government took its seat at Montgomery, he and his two younger brothers offered their services, and all joined the Southern army. The youngest was subsequently killed at Gettysburg. James Mitchel served gallantly as the Adjutant of General Gordon's brigade of Georgia troops, and lost his right arm in one of the battles around Richmond. John Mitchel (our hero) received an appointment as Lieutenant from the Secretary of War at Montgomery, and was ordered to join the battalion of South Carolina Regular Artillery, stationed at Fort Moultrie. He took part in the famous attack on Fort Sumter, 12th and 13th April, 1861, and was assigned to the service of the hotshot-guns of the Sumter battery at Fort Moultrie, which set fire to Fort Sumter, occasioning the b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. did General L. A. Armistead fight on the Federal side at First Manassas? (search)
two Majors, seven Captains, one Lieutenant, and fourteen who were privates, or whose rank is not given. Among the Congressmen prominent in the Confederate Government who did not serve in the army are Senator Garland of Arkansas, and Ben Hill of Georgia, who were in the Confederate Senate, Alexander H. Stephens, the Confederacy's Vice-President, Joseph E. Brown, who was the War-Governor of Georgia, Singleton of Mississippi, and Vest of Missouri, who were in the Rebel Congress, and Reagan of TexGeorgia, Singleton of Mississippi, and Vest of Missouri, who were in the Rebel Congress, and Reagan of Texas, who was Postmaster-General of the Confederacy during its whole existence. We have no doubt that the soldiers on the other side of the Potomac really rejoice that the South has so frequently put into places of honor the men who fought for her, as much as they detest the general custom of the North to pass by her soldiers and honor instead those who were invisible in war and are now invincible in peace. The Man who saw the Beginning and the End. Major Wilmer McLean, who died in Alexa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Third Battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
uarter-Masters Sergeant, Albert T. Emory, of Queen Anne's county, Md; First Battery Sergeant, James M. Buchanan, Jr., of Baltimore county, Md; Second Battery Sergeant, John P. Hooper, of Cambridge, Md.; Third Battery Sergeant, Ed. H. Langley, of Georgia; Fourth Battery Sergeant, Thomas D. Giles, of Delaware; Battery Surgeon, Dr. J. W. Franklin, of Virginia. The company consisted of ninety-two men, exclusive of the commissioned officers. Of the former, about twenty were from Maryland, and tere the brigade remained till the 1st of August, 1862. The camp here was called Camp Hatton, in honor of General R. Hatton, who was killed near Richmond in June of the same year. During this encampment the battery received fifty recruits from Georgia. The next movement was to Tazewell, in East Tennessee, where the enemy was met, defeated, and driven back to Cumberland Gap. On the night of the 16th inst., General Reynolds advanced within four miles of the Gap, driving in the outposts of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
Notes and Queries. [from the free Trader.] Sherman in Atlanta. It is a remarkable fact that while the male natives of the South have ceased to bear animosity toward the grim old warrior who left a black souvenir of Georgia forty miles wide and 300 long, the women, on the contrary, will never forget that Sherman burned their homes, and they uniformly refuse to regard him as anything else than an invader, and a despoiler.--Cincinnati Commercial. The women of the South would be lost to all decency and self-respect if they ever should look upon Sherman as anything else than an invader, despoiler and brigand. Sherman went beyond his legitimate duties to tyranize over helpless women and children; he went out of his way to exercise heartless cruelty. Sherman ordered the women and children in Atlanta to leave their homes within five days. The Mayor of the city appealed to Sherman for mercy, representing in piteous language the woe, the horror, the suffering, not to be des
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's march to the sea, as seen by a Northern soldier, (search)
sit down and listen to what they can tell will find his respect for the ignorant and savage Indians increased. But these were preparatory lessons. When Sherman cut loose from Atlanta everybody had license to throw off all restraints and make Georgia drain the bitter cup. In the first place Sherman intended to subsist on the country. Details were made from every regiment to forage. The quartermasters and commissaries took in all live stock, hay, grain, meat, etc., and destroyed what the have consumed all the forage on a line of thirty miles front from Atlanta to Savannah; also all the sweet potatoes, cattle, hogs, sheep and poultry, and have carried away more than 10,000 horses and mules. I estimate the damage done to the State of Georgia at $100,000,000, $80,000,000 of which is simply waste and destruction. Does Lee's report of the Pennsylvania campaign contain any such figures? He had the same right to plunder, burn and destroy, as Sherman had, and yet, he did not destr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9.91 (search)
e in the Army of Northern Virginia, July 23 and October 4, 1862, but with the exceptions noted, they do not appear in the reports of the battles of Manassas Plains. First Virginia Regiment. Colonel J. T. Brown. Coke's Va. Battery, (Williamsburg Artillery.) Dance's Va. Battery, (Powhatan Artillery.) Hupp's Va. Battery, (Salem Artillery.) Macon's Battery, (Richmond Fayette Artillery.) Smith's Battery, (3d Co. Richmond Howitzers.) Watson's Battery, (2d Co. Richmond Howitzers.) Sumter (Georgia) Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel A. S. Cutts. Blackshear's Battery, (D.) Lane's Battery, (C.) Patterson's Battery, (B.) Ross's Battery, (A.) Miscellaneous Batteries. Ancell's Va. Battery, (Fluvanna Art.) Cutshaw's Virginia Battery. Mentioned in the reports, but assignments not indicated. Fleet's Va. Battery, (Middlesex Art.) Mentioned in the reports, but assignments not indicated. Huckstep's Virginia Battery. Johnson's Virginia Battery. Mentioned in the reports, but assign
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
Editorial paragraphs. General Fitzhugh Lee's tour in South Carolina and Georgia, in behalf of the Southern Historical Society, has been one continued ovation, and a splendid success. Leaving Richmond at 3:15 P. M., on Monday, Nov. 13th, by the Atlantic coast line, we found ourselves at 2 A. M. the next morning, at the liohn B. Peck, General Manager of the S. C. R. R.; Colonel J. W Green, General Manager of the Georgia railroad; General E. P. Alexander, President of the Central & S. W. Ga. R. R.; Gov. Jos. E. Brown, President of the Atlantic and Western railroad; Dr. Hillyer, President of the Kingston and Rome railroad; Colonel W. J. Houston, Gener our friends wherever he may go as a gallant, genial gentleman, and the most efficient agent we ever knew. Major Lachland H. Mcintosh, our General Agent for Georgia, Alabama and Florida, has just sent us a list of subscribers from Savannah, which is, we trust, an earnest of many more to follow. It was a great pleasure to hav