hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 36 results in 7 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
1807-47), whose work was seen through the press in England by Dickens himself. Of more importance in these times was Georgia scenes (1835), a series of inimitable and clear—cut pictures of the rude life of the South-east, by Augustus Baldwin Lonreer to humour in the South, which before the Civil War enlisted at least a dozen considerable names in its ranks. From Georgia also came Major Jones's courtship (1840), intimate and comic letters by William Tappan Thompson (1812-82), who had an interesting career as editor and soldier in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Florida, Maryland, and Georgia. One of the best of early Southern humorists was an Alabama editor, Johnson J. Hooper (1815-62), whose Adventures of Captain Simon Suggs (1846) was admired perhaps the most delicate touch of his time and section. Charles Henry Smith,Bill Arp so-called (1826-1903), wrote from Georgia a series of letters, beginning with the mildly defiant Bill Arp to Abe Linkhorn, which marked him as a brave and sensiti
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: poets of the Civil War I (search)
d. In the fourth year of the war the note of triumph passed from the Southern to the Northern poets. S. H. M. Byers's Sherman's March to the sea and Halpine's The song of Sherman's Army are almost gay, and Henry Clay Work's Marching through Georgia if not gay is nothing else. Holmes's Sherman's in Savannah rhymed the name of the fallen city with banner. Strangely haunting is Whitman's Ethiopia Saluting the Colors. Also haunting, but sad, is Melville's A Dirge for McPherson—— True fable poem The battle hymn of the republic, but the words proved too fine to suit the soldiers, who would not sing of grapes of wrath or the beauty of the lilies. They preferred instead such pieces as Three hundred thousand more, Marching through Georgia, and The year of Jubilee, which have been already mentioned, the equally favoured The battle Cry of freedom, Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, and Just before the battle, mother, of George Frederick Root, and Walter Kittredge's Tenting on the old camp ground
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: poets of the Civil War II (search)
honour of those who died in that war, was colonel of an Alabama regiment and later a staff officer in the Confederate Army. Henry Rootes Jackson, who had also fought in the Mexican War and had written My wife and child and The red old Hills of Georgia, served under Hood in the battles around Atlanta, commanded a brigade in the Army of Tennessee, and was captured in the battle of Nashville. Their poems of the Mexican War were frequently quoted, and in fact were printed in nearly all the Southms are characterized by delicacy of feeling, conscientious workmanship, and a certain assimilation of the best qualities of other poets. His magnanimous spirit after the war, as revealed in his tributes to Whittier and Longfellow, his revelation of the picturesqueness of the Southern landscapes and especially of the pine forests of Georgia, are the substantial features of his poetry. As a connecting link between Simms and Lanier he has a permanent place in the literary history of the South.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: the New South: Lanier (search)
o the earlier times before the railroad came to central Georgia. They form a sympathetic record of the ways ane aboriginal, colonial, and Revolutionary epochs of Georgia. The book was the product of careful research in te past which charms in Johnston and Bagby. Hill in Georgia fought for the preservation of national unity even us Cincinnatus Lamar (1825– 93). Born and reared in Georgia, and a strict disciple of Calhoun, he removed at thhoun, Jabez Lamar Monroe Curry (1825-1903), born in Georgia but reared in Alabama, learned at the University ofaduation he became a journalist. The journalism of Georgia, like that of the whole South, was then in a deplorr, my son, looking abroad upon a better and grander Georgia—a Georgia that has filled the destiny God intended and but the presentation of a widespread problem of Georgia agriculture. Corn attracted favourable attentionaunted by ideas for poems. As an obscure lawyer in Georgia he complained to Paul Hamilton Hayne of the thousan
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
, 1848,—a date now celebrated annually in all Georgia schools. It is a remarkable fact that the middle counties of Georgia have produced the most representative humorists of the South. Among thoseorn or who at some time lived in this part of Georgia may be mentioned A. B. Longstreet, See also Book II, Chap. XIX. the author of Georgia scenes; Richard Malcolm Johnston, See also Book IIIy Lanier. See also Book III. Chap. IV. Middle Georgia was also before the war the most democrati of the richest men, he tells us, Stories of Georgia (1896), p. 24<*> were put in the fields to wo Lowell has written. In the march through Georgia, General Sherman's army devastated the Turneroastal rice plantations of South Carolina and Georgia. These two volumes represent the author's be the rice-field negroes of South Carolina and Georgia are known to have come from the west coast ofice plantations of coastal South Carolina and Georgia as the Uncle Remus dialect is spoken on the c
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
is an interesting study. He was inspired not by Irving or by any of the Northerners, but by Longstreet, See also Book II, Chap. XIX. whose brutally realistic Georgia scenes had appeared as early as 1835. In 1857 Johnston had written The Goose pond School and had followed it with other realistic studies for The Southern magazine. Later they were gathered for a Southern edition entitled Georgia sketches, and still later, in 1871, he had reissued them in Baltimore as Dukesborough tales. He, therefore, must be reckoned with Harte as a pioneer, though his work had few readers and no influence until it was again reissued by the Harpers in 1883. Even then, and afterwards when he had added new and more artistically handled material, he was not a highly significant figure. Studies of provincial Georgia life he could make, some of them bitingly true, but his range was small and his soundings, even within his narrow area, were not deep. He must be classified with the makers of sketche
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
rge Eliot. See Cross, Marian Evans George Selwyn (Walt Whitman), 263 n. Georgia scenes, 153, 347, 389 Georgia sketches, 389 Georgia volunteer, the, 30Georgia sketches, 389 Georgia volunteer, the, 306-307 Geschichte der Colonisation von New England, 136 Gettysburg, 276, 284 Gettysburg address, 256 Gibbons, James Sloan, 281 Gibbons vs. Ogden, 75, 93 nGeorgia volunteer, the, 306-307 Geschichte der Colonisation von New England, 136 Gettysburg, 276, 284 Gettysburg address, 256 Gibbons, James Sloan, 281 Gibbons vs. Ogden, 75, 93 n. Gift, the, 174 Gift of Friendship, the, 174 Gift of Friendship, a Token of Remembrance for 1848, The, 171, 174 Gilchrist, Anne, 271, 272, 272 n., 273 21, 30 Marbury vs. Madison, 73-74 Marching along, 285 Marching through Georgia, 284, 285 March to Moscow, 305 Marcy, W. L., 120 Marchen und Sagen der a71 Realf, Richard, 286 Rebel Rhymes and rhapsodies, 298 Red old Hills of Georgia, the, 290 Reaper and the flowers, the, 35 Records of a School, 20 Reedckson's way, 298, 299, 304, 307 Stories mother nature told, 405 Stories of Georgia, 348 n. Stories revived, 387 Story, Joseph, 71, 72, 76-78, 118 Story, W