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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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meeting, and tendered the governor 500 volunteers to take the arsenal and expel the Union troops! The adjutant-general made his appearance with the dispatch, from the hands of the governor. It was signed by well-known, honored citizens. The adjutant-general complained of the impropriety of a direct offer of volunteers to the governor of a State which had not seceded, and might not secede. Only a few weeks before, South Carolina, and in this same month, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama and Georgia, had passed ordinances of secession; and Texas, February 11th, submitted it to a vote of the people, to be taken on the 23d of that month. But Arkansas had not yet voted to hold a convention. The adjutant-general concluded that such a tender of troops to the governor was impracticable under the circumstances. He would telegraph the citizens of Helena to that effect, since the governor had given him the dispatch to answer. Adjutant-General Burgevine was brother-in-law of Governor Rect
ted for Walker's infantry division. General Beauregard wrote to him on December 2d, to reinforce Hood in Tennessee or make a diversion in Missouri. The diversion had been made, as General Smith had already written to the President, by General Price, who took with him to Missouri a force most of which was then available for no other purpose. He had thus drawn the Sixteenth army corps (A. J. Smith) from Memphis, and Grierson's cavalry from Mississippi, leaving Forrest free to operate in northern Georgia, compelling the Federals to concentrate 50,000 men in Missouri and diverting reinforcements which would have been sent to Sherman. Gen. John B. Magruder, now in command of the district of Arkansas, kept Steele at Little Rock, in constant apprehension of a movement against that city. General Smith at one time in November seriously contemplated such a movement, and Churchill's, Polignac's, Forney's and M. M. Parsons' divisions were assembled in the vicinity of Camden. Parsons' Texas
ockery seemed designed for a soldier. Nothing excited him. His apparent indifference to danger was such in fact that at times it rendered him negligent of necessary precautions. It was this defect, really, that prevented his further promotion. Upon the promotion of Colonel Dockery, Lieutenant-Colonel Dismukes became colonel of the regiment. The Nineteenth and Eighth, consolidated under command of Col. A. L. Hutchisor served in Cleburne's division at Ringgold gap and the retreat through Georgia. A second Nineteenth Arkansas infantry was organized in Nashville, Ark., the latter part of the year 1861, electing as officers Col C. L. Dawson, Lieut.--Col. P. R. Smith, Maj. Joseph Anderson. The company commanders were: A, Captain Castleman; B, Capt. Gabe Stewart; C, Captain Spars; D, Capt. J. H. Carter; E, Capt. Nathan Eldridge; F, Capt. D. H. Hamiter; G, Capt. D. C. Cowling; H, Captain Featherston; J, Capt. B. H. Kinsworthy; K, Captain Herndon. The regiment participated in the battl
h Tennessee; Trigg's and Calvert's Arkansas batteries, Captain Shoup. Third brigade, Brig.-Gen. S. A. M. Wood—Eighth Arkansas, Col. W. K. Patterson; Ninth (Fourteenth) Arkansas battalion, Maj. J. H. Kelly; and Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee and Georgia commands. The First corps, General Polk, included the Thirteenth Arkansas, commanded successively by Lieut.-Col. A. D. Grayson, Maj. James A. McNeely, and Col. James C. Tappan, in A. P. Stewart's Tennessee brigade. The Second corps, General d to strike Dalton and leave Chattanooga twenty-five miles to the north. It is thought Bragg should have held Chattanooga, since to leave it was to lose all east Tennessee south of Knoxville. But Bragg hesitated to risk his communications with Georgia, and he therefore moved out of that city September 8th, with an effective force of 40,000. Rosecrans' force in the field was about 65,000. Bragg took position between the branches of Chickamauga creek, extending his line from Ringgold southwar
hundreds of prisoners, and when involved in the general defeat, he made a heroic fight at Ringgold gap and saved Bragg's artillery and wagon train. In recognition of this gallant exploit, the Confederate Congress passed the following joint resolution: Resolved, that the thanks of Congress are due, and are hereby tendered to Maj.-Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne, and the officers and men under his command, for the victory obtained by them over superior forces of the enemy at Ringgold gap in the State of Georgia on the 27th day of November, 1863, by which the advance of the enemy was impeded, our wagon trains and most of our artillery saved, and a large number of the enemy killed and wounded. One of the most brilliant episodes of the Atlanta campaign of 1864 was Cleburne's victory at Pickett's mill over Howard's corps of Sherman's army. In the awful carnage at Franklin, November 30, 1864, Cleburne, the Stonewall Jackson of the West, gave his last battle order. Within twenty paces of the Uni